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My 782

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walls00000

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Get a regular Cub Cadet belt for that thrower. Those FHP belts from auto parts stores just don't cut it. On my third seeason with thye belt I got with the thrower 4 years a go. Thrower is on a 1650 IH Cub. My 782 is waiting for a replacement engine block bore at the machine shop. Nice looking tractor you got yourself there.
Thanks Roger. I have some time before the snow starts flying but I'll take your advice. All the best for the engine block bore job, these machines are well worth it
 

walls00000

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That belt would be for use with the proper 5/8" pulley on the snow thrower. If you keep the pulley as is, you will most likely still have problems. There is an available "speed up" pulley that will increase the auger speed but you'll want to be sure that the gearbox and other drive parts are up to the task.

View attachment 144576

Here's A LINK TO MORE INFORMATION as mentioned in the above image.
Thanks for the advice Kraig, The diameter on the pulley I have enables the snow thrower to perform pretty well. I have to be careful with my speed given the amount of snow in front of it can bog it down if I go too fast as it is. I'm not sure I want to change the pulley diameter. I'm guessing this pulley is smaller in diameter? I've only heard of horror stories of things breaking with a change to a high speed pulley. One thing I would consider to go ahead with it would be for a matching belt width so that I'll keep in mind. I'll try the OEM belt first
 

walls00000

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Getting back to the original story, I mentioned the transaxle linkage had some (cough trunnion) issues. I'm thinking pretty much everyone here knows what a trunnion is, but I didn't until I bought this tractor. In short, (and please feel free to correct me) the trunnion is a spring that allows the linkage between the operator and the transaxle to have some give to it. If the spring in the trunnion can't move, the tractor speed control will be very jerky. I found myself getting jolted from a dead stop to just about full speed, and I needed to throw it into reverse to just slow down. Here's the way the. trunnion was performing at the time I bought the tractor:
 

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walls00000

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Here's a close up of the trunnion that was providing me with many jolts, both forward and reverse (stloj?).
trunnion2.png
 

walls00000

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So to access the trunnion, the fenders and center cover need to come off to be able to access the linkage. The trunnion is just to the left of the pump

rear_end_top_view.jpg

I needed a good set of spring clips to remove the retainer rings holding the spring. The fix is to fill in the corners of the key stock with weld or in my case silver solder so the washers don't get stuck and the spring can compress inside the retainer key stock. On my fix, I used silver solder as my only welder is a Lincoln AC tombstone stick welder and it would be too much for a small piece like the key stock holding the spring. Here's a pic of the fix (not me - my crazy diesel mechanic uncle):
trunnion_silver_solder_keystock2jpg.jpeg
trunnion_silver_solder_keystock.jpg

The silver solder fixed it just fine and it has been a couple of years and the linkage is as good as it was the day of the fix. One thing to mention, I didn't remove the key stock retainer from the tractor; it stayed attached. That being the case, I made sure to put wet rags all around the pump and placed pieces of scrap steel under and around the key stock to keep everything else from heating up or catching fire. While everything was apart, we put the trunnion and linkage back together, reset neutral in the linkage and tightened everything up. This fix was by far the most rewarding, as my tractor went from being a jerk, to being docile and more precise. It took my uncle and me (a newb) about a day to do (including a trip to the store for some new spring clips!)
 

walls00000

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I'm due to pick up a belt for the qa42a snow thrower soon, thanks to kmcconaughey, I have a part number. When I do, I'll update this post . . . but in the meantime I can give an update. This summer I was working on adapting my craftsman bucket to my 782. The issue was I bent the old fabricated frame for the bucket - it was a hambone job anyway.
bent_frame1.jpeg
bent_frame2.jpeg

I hadn't yet made a mount for my 42 inch plow (off a suburban I believe). So I decided to make a frame that would handle both. A word about the craftsman bucket. . . the bucket has an inherent design flaw with the latch. The old latch position is on that top cross bar between the bucket and the tractor. The old rusted weld still shows where it was cut off. The issue is that it would only latch when it was in a certain position, which made no sense at all. After moving the latch from the top and attaching it to an arm welded to the bottom brace, it fixed the issue and it's a pretty good bucket. The reason the old bucket frame failed was I used 1/4" material (it may have even been 3/16) where I should have used 3/8". Additionally, this frame attached to the front only where I have seen frames for pushing implements connect underneath to the middle of the tractor. My new frame is modeled after this design. Here's the plow which will attach to the same frame:
plow_fitting.jpeg


To start, I tac welded 3/8 material and bent them symmetrically on a 20 ton press.
plow_frame_bend.jpeg

This picture shows how the frame shape after a bit of welding
20210516_151602.jpg


I didn't make the wings at the back long enough to catch the back mount. The frame weighs around 20lbs so it was too much of a pain to mount with short wings, so I lengthened the top wings . . .
20210516_151611.jpg


Now it is simple to install - the wings catch the back bar and the spring loaded latch catches the front bar on the frame. I needed to ream the rear holes so it would catch all the way in with no play. Now on with the bucket. The bucket or plow mounts with a beefy solid dowel through some steel pipe cut to 1" sections and welded to the frame. I had to pay close attention to the steel pulling too much. This is how the bucket lines up, the second picture shows a good side view of the latch modification. Since I cut away the old frame supporting the dump lever, it was left hanging (literally). I fabricated a smaller frame which attaches nicely to the front of the tractor. I imagine this might be different in the future - either an acme screw or hydro - difficult to find the duel action valves though
20210701_185344.jpg
20210701_185354.jpg

And finally the lift rod attaches to the right lift arm on the tractor. In the near future, I will make this rod more adjustable so it also fits the plow. But this is the way it looks at the moment
20210701_185406.jpg


I'm happy with the way it came out except for the slight racking on the craftsman frame because the lift rod mounts to the right side of the frame. I plan to revisit and fix that issue, but for now it's finished, and it works great! Here's an updated picture. I will update with a plow picture when the plow is complete
20210703_171823.jpg
 
Last edited:

bmader

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Dec 22, 2015
Messages
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brian mader
I'm due to pick up a belt for the qa42a snow thrower soon, thanks to kmcconaughey, I have a part number. When I do, I'll update this post . . . but in the meantime I can give an update. This summer I was working on adapting my craftsman bucket to my 782. The issue was I bent the old fabricated frame for the bucket - it was a hambone job anyway.
View attachment 146225 View attachment 146226
I hadn't yet made a mount for my 42 inch plow (off a suburban I believe). So I decided to make a frame that would handle both. A word about the craftsman bucket. . . the bucket has an inherent design flaw with the latch. The old latch position is on that top cross bar between the bucket and the tractor. The old rusted weld still shows where it was cut off. The issue is that it would only latch when it was in a certain position, which made no sense at all. After moving the latch from the top and attaching it to an arm welded to the bottom brace, it fixed the issue and it's a pretty good bucket. The reason the old bucket frame failed was I used 1/4" material (it may have even been 3/16) where I should have used 3/8". Additionally, this frame attached to the front only where I have seen frames for pushing implements connect underneath to the middle of the tractor. My new frame is modeled after this design. Here's the plow which will attach to the same frame:
View attachment 146227

To start, I tac welded 3/8 material and bent them symmetrically on a 20 ton press.
View attachment 146228
This picture shows how the frame shape after a bit of welding
View attachment 146229

I didn't make the wings at the back long enough to catch the back mount. The frame weighs around 20lbs so it was too much of a pain to mount with short wings, so I lengthened the top wings . . .
View attachment 146230

Now it is simple to install - the wings catch the back bar and the spring loaded latch catches the front bar on the frame. I needed to ream the rear holes so it would catch all the way in with no play. Now on with the bucket. The bucket or plow mounts with a beefy solid dowel through some steel pipe cut to 1" sections and welded to the frame. I had to pay close attention to the steel pulling too much. This is how the bucket lines up, the second picture shows a good side view of the latch modification. Since I cut away the old frame supporting the dump lever, it was left hanging (literally). I fabricated a smaller frame which attaches nicely to the front of the tractor. I imagine this might be different in the future - either an acme screw or hydro - difficult to find the duel action valves though
View attachment 146231 View attachment 146232
And finally the lift rod attaches to the right lift arm on the tractor. In the near future, I will make this rod more adjustable so it also fits the plow. But this is the way it looks at the moment
View attachment 146233

I'm happy with the way it came out except for the slight racking on the craftsman frame because the lift rod mounts to the right side of the frame. I plan to revisit and fix that issue, but for now it's finished, and it works great! Here's an updated picture. I will update with a plow picture when the plow is complete
View attachment 146234
Like your press attachment, do you have any more pictures of both parts?
 

walls00000

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walls00000
Like your press attachment, do you have any more pictures of both parts?
Yeah sure! Happy to share. I refer to this thing as a press brake and die, and I could be wrong about the name. It
came out of need for bending metal. I use it to bend thick steel more precisely than I can do with a vice. Doing it this way keeps all four legs of my bench on the floor too! I don't have a victor style torch, so heating metal this thick takes a long time with the torch I have. The idea is not mine, and it came from a friend's shop where he has a hydraulic press/brake machine that bends and cuts steel in seconds. I figured I could do the same on the cheap with a simple 20 ton manual press and a bit of fabrication. What I came up with is this brake/blade made of 1/4" and 3/8" flat stock, 1/4" X 2" angle iron and two small pieces of 1/4" x 2" square tubing. Making the two pieces of square tubing exactly the same was a challenge with an angle grinder. I payed special attention to that as equal distribution of force is critical.. The blade can be removed and it's held in by two 1/2" bolts threaded into the vertical piece closest to the front. The die is a piece of 3/8 flat stock with two pieces of 3" angle iron welded to it. Its a simple design and it seems to work well for what I'm doing.
press_break_jig.jpeg
die1.jpeg
press_blade_jig1.jpeg
die2.jpeg


My only complaint is cranking the cylinder by hand. Maybe I'll get to modify it like this guy:
 

bmader

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Dec 22, 2015
Messages
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displayname
brian mader
Yeah sure! Happy to share. I refer to this thing as a press brake and die, and I could be wrong about the name. It
came out of need for bending metal. I use it to bend thick steel more precisely than I can do with a vice. Doing it this way keeps all four legs of my bench on the floor too! I don't have a victor style torch, so heating metal this thick takes a long time with the torch I have. The idea is not mine, and it came from a friend's shop where he has a hydraulic press/brake machine that bends and cuts steel in seconds. I figured I could do the same on the cheap with a simple 20 ton manual press and a bit of fabrication. What I came up with is this brake/blade made of 1/4" and 3/8" flat stock, 1/4" X 2" angle iron and two small pieces of 1/4" x 2" square tubing. Making the two pieces of square tubing exactly the same was a challenge with an angle grinder. I payed special attention to that as equal distribution of force is critical.. The blade can be removed and it's held in by two 1/2" bolts threaded into the vertical piece closest to the front. The die is a piece of 3/8 flat stock with two pieces of 3" angle iron welded to it. Its a simple design and it seems to work well for what I'm doing.
View attachment 146463 View attachment 146460 View attachment 146462 View attachment 146461

My only complaint is cranking the cylinder by hand. Maybe I'll get to modify it like this guy:

Yeah sure! Happy to share. I refer to this thing as a press brake and die, and I could be wrong about the name. It
came out of need for bending metal. I use it to bend thick steel more precisely than I can do with a vice. Doing it this way keeps all four legs of my bench on the floor too! I don't have a victor style torch, so heating metal this thick takes a long time with the torch I have. The idea is not mine, and it came from a friend's shop where he has a hydraulic press/brake machine that bends and cuts steel in seconds. I figured I could do the same on the cheap with a simple 20 ton manual press and a bit of fabrication. What I came up with is this brake/blade made of 1/4" and 3/8" flat stock, 1/4" X 2" angle iron and two small pieces of 1/4" x 2" square tubing. Making the two pieces of square tubing exactly the same was a challenge with an angle grinder. I payed special attention to that as equal distribution of force is critical.. The blade can be removed and it's held in by two 1/2" bolts threaded into the vertical piece closest to the front. The die is a piece of 3/8 flat stock with two pieces of 3" angle iron welded to it. Its a simple design and it seems to work well for what I'm doing.
View attachment 146463 View attachment 146460 View attachment 146462 View attachment 146461

My only complaint is cranking the cylinder by hand. Maybe I'll get to modify it like this guy:

Thanks so much
 

walls00000

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walls00000
I finished fitting the plow frame to the plow and tried it out on the last snow ~7". I didn't even have chains, although the area is flat, and it worked great. Verry happy. The only complaint is that the plow starts to lift off tje ground when pushing a lot of snow.
20211121_170729.jpg

I made the control rod adjustable so it fits both the bucket and the plow
20211121_170451.jpg

20220108_132437.jpg

Next step is to take the rust off the plow and give it a nice coat of paint
 

walls00000

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walls00000
I finished fitting the plow frame to the plow and tried it out on the last snow ~7". I didn't even have chains, although the area is flat, and it worked great. Verry happy. The only complaint is that the plow starts to lift off tje ground when pushing a lot of snow.View attachment 147397
I made the control rod adjustable so it fits both the bucket and the plowView attachment 147398
View attachment 147399
Next step is to take the rust off the plow and give it a nice coat of paint
As winter progresses, I'll be switching to the qa42a thrower. I found the belt that came with it, and I remember that it was so tight, that I just figured that it wasn't made to fit the 782. Any advice on getting the belt on? Also, the local cub dealer told me they can't get replacement belts. Where can I find one?
 

Mark Evans

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Joined
Jul 26, 2021
Messages
119
Location
Perryton, Tx 79070
View attachment 144536
Hello everyone. This is my 782 on the day I picked it up. It started up after some cranking, but the engine (KT-17 series 1) sounded pretty good. The mower 44" mower deck had rust on it, the seat was shredded, the paint was faded, and it had the wrong rear tires and mismatched front ones. It came with a rusted cart (behind me) and had a cub cadet utility box with a tow hitch ball welded to it. Although the engine ran pretty good, there was definitely an issue with the transmission linkage (cough(trunnion)), as the tractor wouldn't go slow, which made it a challenge to get it on my 4x8 flat bed without ramps. It goes faster than I expected, it's powerful and it has a beefy transmission which is what I was looking for in my next tractor. After a trip down the driveway, I was thrilled with the ride and I was sold.
Very nice here’s mine it’s 1982 w/18 magnum and hydraulics, 44 deck, still need to finish re-wiring it !!!!
 

Mark Evans

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 26, 2021
Messages
119
Location
Perryton, Tx 79070
I'm due to pick up a belt for the qa42a snow thrower soon, thanks to kmcconaughey, I have a part number. When I do, I'll update this post . . . but in the meantime I can give an update. This summer I was working on adapting my craftsman bucket to my 782. The issue was I bent the old fabricated frame for the bucket - it was a hambone job anyway.
View attachment 146225 View attachment 146226
I hadn't yet made a mount for my 42 inch plow (off a suburban I believe). So I decided to make a frame that would handle both. A word about the craftsman bucket. . . the bucket has an inherent design flaw with the latch. The old latch position is on that top cross bar between the bucket and the tractor. The old rusted weld still shows where it was cut off. The issue is that it would only latch when it was in a certain position, which made no sense at all. After moving the latch from the top and attaching it to an arm welded to the bottom brace, it fixed the issue and it's a pretty good bucket. The reason the old bucket frame failed was I used 1/4" material (it may have even been 3/16) where I should have used 3/8". Additionally, this frame attached to the front only where I have seen frames for pushing implements connect underneath to the middle of the tractor. My new frame is modeled after this design. Here's the plow which will attach to the same frame:
View attachment 146227

To start, I tac welded 3/8 material and bent them symmetrically on a 20 ton press.
View attachment 146228
This picture shows how the frame shape after a bit of welding
View attachment 146229

I didn't make the wings at the back long enough to catch the back mount. The frame weighs around 20lbs so it was too much of a pain to mount with short wings, so I lengthened the top wings . . .
View attachment 146230

Now it is simple to install - the wings catch the back bar and the spring loaded latch catches the front bar on the frame. I needed to ream the rear holes so it would catch all the way in with no play. Now on with the bucket. The bucket or plow mounts with a beefy solid dowel through some steel pipe cut to 1" sections and welded to the frame. I had to pay close attention to the steel pulling too much. This is how the bucket lines up, the second picture shows a good side view of the latch modification. Since I cut away the old frame supporting the dump lever, it was left hanging (literally). I fabricated a smaller frame which attaches nicely to the front of the tractor. I imagine this might be different in the future - either an acme screw or hydro - difficult to find the duel action valves though
View attachment 146231 View attachment 146232
And finally the lift rod attaches to the right lift arm on the tractor. In the near future, I will make this rod more adjustable so it also fits the plow. But this is the way it looks at the moment
View attachment 146233

I'm happy with the way it came out except for the slight racking on the craftsman frame because the lift rod mounts to the right side of the frame. I plan to revisit and fix that issue, but for now it's finished, and it works great! Here's an updated picture. I will update with a plow picture when the plow is complete
View attachment 146234
I REALLY LIKE YOUR WORK ON THIS !!!!
 

walls00000

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Messages
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01581
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walls00000
I REALLY LIKE YOUR WORK ON THIS !!!!
Hey thanks! Mine is about the same vintage as yours - I looked up the model and serial at one time and I believe it's about 1982-1983. The plow is working well with the new frame. I just finished plowing New England's Wintery Mix and it works great. An 18 magnum very nice! Was that a replacement or did they come with magnums at one point? I love the hydraulics on this thing. Having a piston onboard just makes me think about what I could make it do given some. time. Mine has the single action hydraulic control for the piston. I keep an eye out for the dual valve that came with some of these, but they are very hard to find. I can think of many things to do with the auxiliary port. Among other things it is a great mower as well with the 44 inch mower deck. Best of luck with it. Love to hear about the re-wiring. It's a great machine!
 

Mark Evans

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 26, 2021
Messages
119
Location
Perryton, Tx 79070
Hey thanks! Mine is about the same vintage as yours - I looked up the model and serial at one time and I believe it's about 1982-1983. The plow is working well with the new frame. I just finished plowing New England's Wintery Mix and it works great. An 18 magnum very nice! Was that a replacement or did they come with magnums at one point? I love the hydraulics on this thing. Having a piston onboard just makes me think about what I could make it do given some. time. Mine has the single action hydraulic control for the piston. I keep an eye out for the dual valve that came with some of these, but they are very hard to find. I can think of many things to do with the auxiliary port. Among other things it is a great mower as well with the 44 inch mower deck. Best of luck with it. Love to hear about the re-wiring. It's a great machine!
It came with the 18 mag and I thank its a factory replacement, they were known for losing one or the other on pistons, when running on a side slope (oil loss) and it’s got the extra valve control for the lines to the front, replaced all tires, wheel seals grease, drive shaft joints rag joints also, pulled engine replaced bottom bolts and new starter, cleaned all engine fines for cooling and, rebearinged the deck, new belts, and mule idlers, replaced the electric clutch bearing too, striped carb and cleaned it even reused the carb gaskets they worked, made with great parts, resealed rear trans and wiped the case and new trans fluid, checked the hydraulic pressures and bypass, and man my top end is like 18 mph it’s fast a reverse too is 10 mph to fast wide open have to throttle down some !!!! The best of luck and may the winds of hope stay at your back and sail true for yours SIR !!!!!
 

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