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My 782

IH Cub Cadet Tractor Forum

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walls00000

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walls00000
Where can I find that bucket
Hello @Gage mcdaniel, I bought that bucket at a sears outlet store in Rhode Island about 10 years ago for $450.00. It appears to still be available online, and the new one looks like it may have the fixed latch. They call it a tractor scoop.
In any case, mine underwent a series of modifications to bring it to what it is today. All that is left from the original craftsman tractor scoop is the bucket, part of the latch, the handle and the racking frame which will be addressed this spring. But even with all that said, it's a great bucket. I use it mostly for moving dirt and stone. It's not quite big enough to make it worthwhile for mulch, but it is a back saver. Sometimes I need to have a shovel on hand to push the material into the bucket a bit more because the bucket doesn't curl upwards, but it beats loading a wheelbarrow.
The next step up would be a johnny bucket, but they are a bit more expensive.
 

walls00000

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Sorry for the late response. The IH-78056-C1 belt that is for the 82 series with a QA42B is 5/8 x 36-1/4".
Ahhhh thank you @kmcconaughey that clears some things up! So It sounds like that belt along with the 4" stock replacement pulley will fix my belt problems.

We just received ~18" of snow and the 1/2x34" V-belt from tractor supply worked pretty well. This is what it looked like on my first pass. . .
Screen Shot 2022-01-30 at 4.10.42 PM.png

I ended up shearing a 1/4" roll pin, but I was back at it after a quick replacement. It has plenty of power, and the 4" pulley is enough for me at the moment. As long as the belt doesn't slip, this thing is a tank. Feeling the balance of power is key, because the tractor can easily push too fast and choke up the auger. I try not to push it to the limits, just go slow and steady. In deep (>24") snow I raise the auger and move ahead 6 feet or so, back up, put the auger down and make another pass and repeat.
Screen Shot 2022-01-30 at 4.09.47 PM.png

One other thing I noticed with this machine, is because it doesn't "throw it like the big boys", it helps to make a relief run (see pic above) close to the edge, then make perpendicular passes towards the edge. This reduces the amount of snow at the end of the run. The nicest thing about this snow thrower, is my back feels great after moving all that snow!
 
Last edited:

Gage mcdaniel

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Jan 8, 2022
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Iowa
Hello @Gage mcdaniel, I bought that bucket at a sears outlet store in Rhode Island about 10 years ago for $450.00. It appears to still be available online, and the new one looks like it may have the fixed latch. They call it a tractor scoop.
In any case, mine underwent a series of modifications to bring it to what it is today. All that is left from the original craftsman tractor scoop is the bucket, part of the latch, the handle and the racking frame which will be addressed this spring. But even with all that said, it's a great bucket. I use it mostly for moving dirt and stone. It's not quite big enough to make it worthwhile for mulch, but it is a back saver. Sometimes I need to have a shovel on hand to push the material into the bucket a bit more because the bucket doesn't curl upwards, but it beats loading a wheelbarrow.
The next step up would be a johnny bucket, but they are a bit more expensive.
Ok thank you
 

walls00000

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Just reviewing the qa42a manual that @PACub100 sent along. Thanks @PACub100! I found a picture in there that gave me pause . . .

Whenever I attach my snow thrower, I think "ok QA stands for "Quick Attach", so this should be quick!" I feel as perhaps my great grandfather did when he boasted how he had the quickest starting Ford model-T in the country. On cold days, he would "Jack up one rear wheel, put it in high gear, (oil would be stiff and hold the engine back,) pour hot water in the radiator and all over the manifold, then he would crank. the S.O.B for half an hour (by hand), and it would start right up!" I find myself thinking that perhaps my great grandfather gave this snow thrower its name! Although it is a back saver once it is attached, this thing weighs about 185lbs! I find myself returning to the same position as the guy pictured below from page 15 of the ccmanuals throwers manual. It might seem I love to be in this position, because I even tend to get into this position without knowing it many times before hearing the beautiful 'click' of the spring loaded latch engaging!
Screen Shot 2022-01-30 at 9.05.49 PM.png

Well, I guess I can be assured that I'm doing it right! :) . . . but the engineer inside me whispers "There's got to be a better way!"
 

glippert

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Greg Lippert
"...and it would start right up!" :roflol:

I learned from Digger a few years back, that putting a wooden 4x4 under the lower arms gets it to just about the right position. When you get those top pickle forks barely onto the shoulder bolts, you can push on the front of the housing & it magically lifts the QA pins into place. I'm 6'6" with a bad back, even after surgery, so bending and lifting like the photo shows ain't gonna happen. The 4x4 trick makes it a snap. (Thanks again, Digger!)
 

walls00000

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walls00000
. . . it magically lifts the QA pins into place

I store mine on a rolling dolly. It's about the right hight, but I just can't get it to work right. The dolly tends to move in the wrong way when I need to line it up. In past years I succeeded with that method, but what a pain. I have also used a 4x4 with a piece of 1" stock on top under the lower arms (one on each side), and lined up the pickle forks to the shoulder bolts, its just that there was no magic in my case. I was looking just like that guy above bending his back. I ended up lining everything up using a crow bar and creeping the tractor forward. I was moving the tractor by pulling the front wheels forward while holding the snowthrower. and that did it. I think each time I get closer to a repeatable systematic method, but I'm still doing a lot of lifting figuring it out. I'm thinking a floor jack might be helpful, but no one suggested that. @glippert and @PACub100 Thanks for the tips!
 

kmcconaughey

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Kraig McConaughey
"...and it would start right up!" :roflol:

I learned from Digger a few years back, that putting a wooden 4x4 under the lower arms gets it to just about the right position. When you get those top pickle forks barely onto the shoulder bolts, you can push on the front of the housing & it magically lifts the QA pins into place. I'm 6'6" with a bad back, even after surgery, so bending and lifting like the photo shows ain't gonna happen. The 4x4 trick makes it a snap. (Thanks again, Digger!)

I've been using something very similar to the 4x4 under the mounting bracket method for many decades with my QA42. Some years it'll snap right into place like magic, other years it's a bit of a struggle. If I were to mount and dismount it a bunch of times in a row I might figure it out exactly. :drool2:
 
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