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Bought something else i prolly dont need.

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cubs4lifeofme

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 3, 2020
Messages
1,184
Location
painted post ny
Went to buy Motorcycle parts and end up buying a stihl ms251c chainsaw. You pull the cord and then in a second or 2 it turns over...wow...he said latest technoligy which scared me ( because technoligy and me dont get along that well ) But it started on 5 th pull so here we go...
 
My dad bought a Stihl with that type of recoil. He was 78 at the time and was still using an outdoor wood stove for heating the house. It turned out to be harder starting than a normal recoil and he hated it after a short time. The regular recoil you can push the saw away with one hand and pull with the other with little effort. The new style there’s no resistance until you get about 3/4 out then a lot of resistance to make the spring engage. He said it hurt his shoulder, but he was 78.
 
Went to buy Motorcycle parts and end up buying a stihl ms251c chainsaw. You pull the cord and then in a second or 2 it turns over...wow...he said latest technoligy which scared me ( because technoligy and me dont get along that well ) But it started on 5 th pull so here we go...
Those new Stihls are easy to pull, the older high compression models are a beast to start.
 
I bought one of those type saws also. Hated it and brought it back to the dealer. At 45 with good shoulders he had no problem but at 82 with bad shoulders, handle not big enough to put your foot in it was not working. He said it takes getting used to and to keep trying and if it didn't work out would do something else. I took it home and cut about 8" off the end of the recoil cord. Works much better now. Another idea I had was to put a 2X4 through the handle and step on it with one foot and pull the cord.
 
So far my shoulders are still pretty good (about the only thing) The only reason i bought it was because it was stone cold sitting on the floor for who knows long and it started in 5 pulls. My best saws usually take 20 pulls to start . kinda concerned about the
long term reliability but time will tell. I got a huge tree's job coming up soon so ima gonna put it thru the test ,lol
 
I most allways push the saw away from me with oposite hand while starting. just seem's easier to me.
I use starting ether when I don't feel like pulling my arm off. Doesn't hurt the motor, there is plenty of lubrication on the cylinder walls from the last run. When the motor cranks it pulls premix from the carb anyhow. Just a little squirt on the air filter does it.
 
I use starting ether when I don't feel like pulling my arm off. Doesn't hurt the motor, there is plenty of lubrication on the cylinder walls from the last run. When the motor cranks it pulls premix from the carb anyhow. Just a little squirt on the air filter does it.
best to use a squirt bottle of mix gas. 2Cycle need the oil to lube or gaud the cylinder walls and, rod and crank bearings
 
Honestly I want a solid pull cord. IE: roll it up on compression stroke, choke up the cord & give it a pull. These Ez starts are nothing more than you winding up a spring till you finally roll it by the compression stroke. Then the spring + weight of flywheel gives it 1-2 more strokes. More moving parts, more to break & service
 
If “They”’really want to make them easy start? Who don’t own a battery drill? Stub out a shaft from the recoil, provide a one way adapter that fits any battery drill.
 
I have a Stihl 028 Super Wood Boss and it's very easy to start... Not a huge saw but good enough for what I need. My dad has a Dolmar and though it's super easy to pull, I flood it almost every single time I try using it.

I like Neil's suggestion... take out the pull cord and weld a nut on the shaft - if there isn't one already - (I'd probably use an Allen wrench style to eliminate spinning edges) and then use a drill. Just like Project Farm does to start his lawnmowers on YouTube 👍😎👍
 
I've have had my Stihl 028AV / 24" bar since 1984. Felling, limbing, cutting cord wood; it's like a Timex with no sign of giving up. I've looked at new ones and in similar power/bar length models they seem to have gone "consumer" backyard varieties. The MS251s I looked at seem to have softer suspensions, and the fuel and oil fillers are something that would easily snap off in the back of my truck. The long recoil I figure was to discourage drop starting, which I myself won't do anyway. I picked mine on the advice of a faller back then. He said they were great for landing work and the skidder operator kept one in his cab and the 28 would be up to my tasks for property work and fire wood and easily handle a 2 ft bar for up to 40" trees. He was right.
 
Got a Stihl 08S from the 1970's, starts on the 3rd or 4th pull always. If yours takes more than that, then it's time for a tune-up and maybe some carb work.
I've also got a Homelite 150, a Homelite EZ2, a McCulloch 110, a SunJoe electric pole saw and a few Sears Craftsman 3.5hp electrics that I picked up at yard sales for cheap.
Say what you will, but my go to saws are the electrics ( if the cord will reach! ) Keep 'em sharp and the electrics will amaze you. Ezy-pezy, throw some bar oil in 'em, plug 'em in and pull the trigger.
I see now a lot of manufactures are making battery powered saws. not cheap ones, but the high quality ones. I think Milwaukee, Husqvarna, Stihl and others.
I once used a hydraulic powered saw from within a bucket truck bucket. It was awesome!
 
My go to saw is a Milwaukee electric M18. Fill bar oil and go. Plenty of power for me and I have extra batteries from all my M18 tools. A year ago I purchased the $1,200 Black Friday deal from Home Depot for $600. I have added the chainsaw and a pole saw. My favorite is the 1/2 impact for cub work. I haven’t used my old reliable CP pneumatic in a long time. My F150 lugs torque to 150 ft lbs and it buzzes them right off. My wife uses the hand blower for leaves and clippings. Great tools!
 
Speaking of electrics, I used to pass them by as "toys". One summer's 10 day trail ride proved me wrong. Our safari of 4X4s was stopped dead by a 3ft diameter tree right across the trail. One of the guys got his Milwaukee Fuel saw out and we had it cut and towed in about 45 minutes. I was quoting Will Smith in "Independence" and finally got one last year. They are nice and no fumes in the back of the 4X4. Had to convince the wife 1st over their cost and I said orchard work! Now it's her goto.
 
I have a Stihl 028 Super Wood Boss and it's very easy to start... Not a huge saw but good enough for what I need. My dad has a Dolmar and though it's super easy to pull, I flood it almost every single time I try using it.

I like Neil's suggestion... take out the pull cord and weld a nut on the shaft - if there isn't one already - (I'd probably use an Allen wrench style to eliminate spinning edges) and then use a drill. Just like Project Farm does to start his lawnmowers on YouTube 👍😎👍
Just a small word of caution...I test a lot of small engines by spinning with a drill..you better be damned quick in pulling the drill back when it fires or you will have a missle in front of you .If you made a kick out adapter I'd say do it but other than that you're asking for an injury. There is a reason old crank tractors had a kick out groove...
 
Just a small word of caution...I test a lot of small engines by spinning with a drill..you better be damned quick in pulling the drill back when it fires or you will have a missle in front of you .If you made a kick out adapter I'd say do it but other than that you're asking for an injury. There is a reason old crank tractors had a kick out groove...
For sure Gary, I've got a 1936 Caterpillar Model 22 that has that. So long as the fly weights in the magneto have retracted into ATDC ( after top dead center ) position to retard the spark when the engines at rest, no worries when you crank it.
If a return spring broke or the slide collar that advances the spark ever got stuck, could be a big problem for your wrist or other body parts in the way of the crank handle.
They show proper hand grip position in the manual to avoid a serious injury in case of kick-back.
 
In our area of New England we find fuel source and age will make a big difference when starting. No discount fuel, mid grade or higher from a good gas station. If stabilized with a good stabilizer, keep less than 40 days. Unstabilized, 20 days. With good, new fuel, 2 to 3 pulls on choke, then continue on the high idle location. The only other thing is VP, Motomix, and other engineered fuels last longer and make them much easier to start.
 
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