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Kirk Engines, Inc Cub Cadet Used Parts CADET CONNECTION Cub Cadet Specialties Cub Cadet Specialties

Archive through July 15, 2019

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jbratton

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Dec 6, 2018
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Justin Bratton
Kraig- thank you for the schematics. I’ve never seen that before. You are super valuable to this forum!

Gerry- Thank you for your input. It sure does help in my quest to better my 147.

Ron- And last but not least, thank you for your insight. I appreciate it!
 

rrschmitt

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Sep 23, 2005
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Ron R. Schmitt
Kraig M/Charlie,

Thanks for the links to the Electric Lift install instructions.
 

ljerickson

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Nov 24, 2006
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Eagan, MN
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Lee J. Erickson
Hi! It's been awhile. I've been using my CC 122 over the years use to drag a trailer to my back yard to load leaves or windfall from my trees.

We have had some unusual winter weather the in the last few years with dumps of really wet snow that a snowblower won't handle, the Kwik-Way loader does just fine.

Recently, I've gotten some really nasty noise from what appears to be from the clutch throw out bearing.

I've pulled the grill and the engine. Right now I'm working on extracting the Spirol pins that locate the pressure plates.

So far, I see that the spring clips on the OD of the friction plate are all broken. And the teaser spring is broken as well.

So, I have these questions:

1) Somehow, I have to release the pressure of the main clutch spring to get the throw out bearing removed. Can I do this by loosening the adjusting rod?

2) After I bought the 122, I replaced the spring clips and the teaser spring.I was prepared to change the friction disc as well, but it was in really good shape, although the pressure plates were a bit hacked up.

Should I replace the spring clips and the teaser spring? I suspect that they don't do much but cause trouble.

Best Regards,
Lee
 

mgwin

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Marty A. Gwin
Lee,

If you only replace a piece or two, you will be back in a year or so fixing it again.
In my opinion, you need to go through the clutch assembly and replace everything. You also need to resurface the pressure plates so they won't eat up your clutch disc.
Fix it right the first time, and it will last a long time.


There is an article in Charlie's FAQ's on taking the clutch apart (line 28). You can find this under the FAQ's at the top of this page.
 

mgwin

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Marty A. Gwin
Lee,

More than likely, all you need to replace is the throwout bearing, teaser spring, clutch plate, and the anti-rattle springs.
Some will tell you to not replace the springs, but I like to, so the clutch plate won't drive you crazy with all that rattling.

It is not all that difficult to rebuild the clutch, just be careful.

I always place the clutch shaft in a vise with the plate against the vise jaws, using two or three layers of cardboard to keep from scarring the shaft.
Also align the spirol pin with the slot in the vise jaws so you can drive out the pin.

Tighten the vise (not super tight) to hold the shaft. Take a large hammer and a brass rod or a piece of hard wood and drive the shaft down just a hair (about 3/16 of an inch) to release the pressure on the coiled spring pin.

You can then drive out the pin and release the vise. Just be careful, the clutch and shaft will jump up about 3 inches.
Don't have anything above the shaft, that would hurt!

After you assemble the parts, you can put it back in the vise with the cardboard and tighten it again.
Then take the hammer and brass rod/block and drive it back down a hair, in order to drive the coiled roll pin back in place.

Make sure you align the slots/holes in the plates with the holes in the shaft, so you can drive the coiled pins back in.
 

ljerickson

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Nov 24, 2006
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52
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Eagan, MN
displayname
Lee J. Erickson
Thanks Marty!

I've read the cubfacts and it has a reproduction of the cub service manual. I'm pretty lucky because I got a copy of the manual with my cub.

There's quite a bit of energy built up in main coiled clutch spring and the manual isn't clear on how to remove it harmlessly. I don't want to hurt myself.

I just wish for advice on this.

I have all the replacement parts on hand and will replace as necessary.

Lee
 

ljerickson

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Nov 24, 2006
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Eagan, MN
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Lee J. Erickson
We seem to bit out of phase on posting here.

So, my question now is how do I drop the drive shaft out of the tractor without doing some ugly damage?

Thanks again,
Lee
 

digger

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Lee E.
Kinda depends on which tractor.
 

digger

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Digger
Talkin about a blast from the past!
I had an invader from Iowa yesterday.

It's great to catch up with great people every now and then.
326210.jpg
 

mgwin

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Reidsville, NC
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Marty A. Gwin
Lee,

The "stored energy" isn't all that bad. Let the vice handle that.
As I stated, just put it in the vise and tighten just enough to hold it in place when you drive it down around 3/16". It don't take much to get it there.

It will not hurt you as long as you are not on top of it when you open the vise. It only jumps up a little bit.
Just remember to use cardboard so you don't scratch the shaft.

In order to get the shaft out of the tractor, take out the bolts in the engine and slide it forward.
Then unhook the clutch release lever and clutch release rod.

Then take a roll pin punch and drive out the coiled spring pin out of the coupling at the tranny.
Now it should come out easily.
You can definitely do this with little difficulty.
 

ljerickson

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Nov 24, 2006
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52
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Eagan, MN
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Lee J. Erickson
Thanks Charlie. It's 122 with a Kwik-Way loader mounted.

I did some more inspection. From below, there's not much to be seen as the loader frame is directly in the way.

From the top, there was a plate between the seat and the control panel. I took this off and found a hacked hole in the frame that provided direct access to the coupling between the drive shaft and the transmission drive stub.

There's also some holes in the side of the frame that provides some access.

Someone's been there before.

I'm thinking the process is this:

1)Release the clutch pedal brake lock.

2)Remove the front end pin on the drive shaft/transmission coupling

3)Disconnect the clutch rod.

4)Pull the hinge pin on the clutch release lever.

5)Everything should fall out nicely.

I'm thinking that the Spirol pin near the transmission stub can be removed with with a punch and hammer. However, I'm a bit worried about the transmission bearing. Anyone think I should fabricate a screw puller?

Thanks to all,
Lee
 

ljerickson

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Eagan, MN
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Lee J. Erickson
Thanks Marty.

It looks like we're posting simultaneously again.

I think we're OK on our thoughts.

The only question I have is: What does the end of a roll pin punch look like? I ordered a bunch of pins from Gamut. They offered me a roll pin punch, but called it back as it is discontinued.

Thanks again,
Lee
 

digger

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Mike F.
Dennis Tiernan is a LONG time member that doesn't post much.
 

kide

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Gerry Ide
Lee E:
Roll Pin Punches are machined from hardened steel to prevent bending or breaking while driving in any size roll pin. These punches are designed with a hemispherical tip to provide proper alignment of the roll pin to prevent damage to the equipment and the roll pin. (somewhat plagiarized from a google response)
Note the protruding rounded tip on the punch..I was told that the the protruding tip also pushes on the center part of the roll pin, apparently working some magic that allows it to drive the pin out easier. Take that with whatever amount of belief you wish

326213.jpg
 

mgwin

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Marty A. Gwin
Dang, Gerry beat me to it! LOL!

Gerry,
It works!
It really makes a HUGE difference!!!

Lee,

A roll pin punch has a round tit on the end to keep it centered while driving out the pin.
You would be amazed how much better they work than a regular punch!
 

ljerickson

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Eagan, MN
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Lee J. Erickson
Thanks Gerry and Marty!

I've ordered a set and they should be here Friday.

Lee
 

kmcconaughey

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Kraig McConaughey
Charlie, Dennis T., wow! Yep, Dennis has been a member here for a very long time at least since 2001. I believe he was at Blunier's first Plow Day and submitted some photos for the Plow Day photo CD. I'll have to do some digging back in my files.

Dennis T.,
 

etopel

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Feb 11, 2008
Messages
66
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Ed Topel
Lee- It's a good idea to support the coupling when driving out the pin. I usually use a piece of wood cut to length to fit between the floor and the coupling snugly.
 

ljerickson

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Nov 24, 2006
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Eagan, MN
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Lee J. Erickson
Thanks Ed,

That's an incredibly good idea.

I was so thinking about something that wrapped around the shaft that I missed this.

Lee
 
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