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To Rebuild or Just Leave As Is

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Joined
Dec 10, 2023
Messages
17
Location
Los Angeles
I've stalled on the restoration of my Cub Cadet 100 due to the usual reasons (work, kids and more pressing projects), but one of the biggest reasons is the engine. I wanted to do a full engine rebuild in line with the rest of my restoration, but a seized exhaust pipe has put me off of trying to do any further work on the engine. I cut the muffler off with a hacksaw and soaked the pipe with three kinds of penetrating oil and tried heating it with a propane torch to no avail. This defeat, coupled with the fact I don't have a budget for a micrometer set and engine assembly tools at the moment lead me to try and find an engine shop in my area to rebuild the engine professionally. All the shops in the area won't touch it; they claim it is too old, they can't get parts (even though I have a source) or "they don't do that kind of work anymore" is the usual excuse.

So, with all this in mind, would it be unwise to just leave the engine alone and restart it as is? The Kohler unit spins freely and I can feel the resistance when it goes into compression, so it isn't seized. The engine had clean oil in it and it was full, so the engine was likely run recently. I just have to get past the stuck exhaust pipe and pray I didn't warp the block with the torch or get metal shavings in the engine from cutting off the muffler (although I cut it below the exhaust port). I'm thinking rebuild the carburetor, replace the head gasket, clean and repaint the engine and try starting it with fresh oil and new ignition components. I'm thinking about doing the same for the transmission, save for removing the top cover and checking the shift forks. I already have a new clutch and steering column.

By skipping a major overhaul on the mechanical components, I feel I can get motivated again to finish this tractor and get it running sooner than I thought.
 

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You are going to need a bit more than a propane torch to do any good on that exhaust elbow.
The so called mechanics/rebuild shops you have contacted are just politely trying to tell you they do not want to mess with this.
At $100 and up per hour of shop time I would not want them to either.
Why did you cut the muffler off?
 
Well, now that you have ruined the elbow, you do not have much choice save cutting new threads on what's left of it to screw a new muffler on and that would be a real chore due to the slight curve and lack of room for a die
 
Well, now that you have ruined the elbow, you do not have much choice save cutting new threads on what's left of it to screw a new muffler on and that would be a real chore due to the slight curve and lack of room for a die
I have a NOS replacement elbow and lock nut, the plan was to sacrifice this one all along since this one was too far gone.
 
Cody. I have removed a broken muffler or two...This what I would do that doesn't mean you should if you lack experience...No.1 leave the big hammer alone the last thing you want to do is break the engine casting...You can drill a 3/8 hole in remaining pipe and put a bolt thru it or use a small pipe wrench for leverage.You are going to need to heat the pipe red hot at least an inch away from block,perhaps several times to get heat transfer enough...Tapping on wrench or bolt to get it started moving is better than a hard pull.The vibration will help break rust loose as well. The odds are you will need acty to get it hot enough...The engine is out,can you take it somewhere to do it? Never discount what penetrating oil can do over time.You might have to heat and cool down..pen. oil burns...That pipe looks solid so I'm not going to explain filing and picking threads(what a long process it is)..break the lock collar off out of the way...Any metal shavings can safely be removed with a magnet..I suggest you degrease the engine first to avoid fires..
 
I may be wrong, but aren't the exhaust elbows just standard pipe thread? I can't tell by the pic, but you may have enough room to tap more threads on your cutoff pipe, and screw a muffler onto that. Most municipalities have a pipe thread kit, as would most hvac, and plumbers.

And if that don't work, most machine shops would be able to get that elbow out pretty quickly.
 
While I will reserve the bolt/wrench trick until last, I am considering rethreading it with a hand pipe threader or finding a suitable muffler with a clamp on connection and just bolting it over my cut. Granted, cutting was probably a hasty decision but my original plan was to strip this engine down completely…and someday I will.
 
I've stalled on the restoration of my Cub Cadet 100 due to the usual reasons (work, kids and more pressing projects), but one of the biggest reasons is the engine. I wanted to do a full engine rebuild in line with the rest of my restoration, but a seized exhaust pipe has put me off of trying to do any further work on the engine. I cut the muffler off with a hacksaw and soaked the pipe with three kinds of penetrating oil and tried heating it with a propane torch to no avail. This defeat, coupled with the fact I don't have a budget for a micrometer set and engine assembly tools at the moment lead me to try and find an engine shop in my area to rebuild the engine professionally. All the shops in the area won't touch it; they claim it is too old, they can't get parts (even though I have a source) or "they don't do that kind of work anymore" is the usual excuse.

So, with all this in mind, would it be unwise to just leave the engine alone and restart it as is? The Kohler unit spins freely and I can feel the resistance when it goes into compression, so it isn't seized. The engine had clean oil in it and it was full, so the engine was likely run recently. I just have to get past the stuck exhaust pipe and pray I didn't warp the block with the torch or get metal shavings in the engine from cutting off the muffler (although I cut it below the exhaust port). I'm thinking rebuild the carburetor, replace the head gasket, clean and repaint the engine and try starting it with fresh oil and new ignition components. I'm thinking about doing the same for the transmission, save for removing the top cover and checking the shift forks. I already have a new clutch and steering column.

By skipping a major overhaul on the mechanical components, I feel I can get motivated again to finish this tractor and get it running sooner than I thought.
If you use kroloil (the best, though expensive). on the lock ring and let set awhile, it will take a blunt punch and gig hammer. With it loose the pipe should come free
 
I've stalled on the restoration of my Cub Cadet 100 due to the usual reasons (work, kids and more pressing projects), but one of the biggest reasons is the engine. I wanted to do a full engine rebuild in line with the rest of my restoration, but a seized exhaust pipe has put me off of trying to do any further work on the engine. I cut the muffler off with a hacksaw and soaked the pipe with three kinds of penetrating oil and tried heating it with a propane torch to no avail. This defeat, coupled with the fact I don't have a budget for a micrometer set and engine assembly tools at the moment lead me to try and find an engine shop in my area to rebuild the engine professionally. All the shops in the area won't touch it; they claim it is too old, they can't get parts (even though I have a source) or "they don't do that kind of work anymore" is the usual excuse.

So, with all this in mind, would it be unwise to just leave the engine alone and restart it as is? The Kohler unit spins freely and I can feel the resistance when it goes into compression, so it isn't seized. The engine had clean oil in it and it was full, so the engine was likely run recently. I just have to get past the stuck exhaust pipe and pray I didn't warp the block with the torch or get metal shavings in the engine from cutting off the muffler (although I cut it below the exhaust port). I'm thinking rebuild the carburetor, replace the head gasket, clean and repaint the engine and try starting it with fresh oil and new ignition components. I'm thinking about doing the same for the transmission, save for removing the top cover and checking the shift forks. I already have a new clutch and steering column.

By skipping a major overhaul on the mechanical components, I feel I can get motivated again to finish this tractor and get it running sooner than I thought.

I've stalled on the restoration of my Cub Cadet 100 due to the usual reasons (work, kids and more pressing projects), but one of the biggest reasons is the engine. I wanted to do a full engine rebuild in line with the rest of my restoration, but a seized exhaust pipe has put me off of trying to do any further work on the engine. I cut the muffler off with a hacksaw and soaked the pipe with three kinds of penetrating oil and tried heating it with a propane torch to no avail. This defeat, coupled with the fact I don't have a budget for a micrometer set and engine assembly tools at the moment lead me to try and find an engine shop in my area to rebuild the engine professionally. All the shops in the area won't touch it; they claim it is too old, they can't get parts (even though I have a source) or "they don't do that kind of work anymore" is the usual excuse.

So, with all this in mind, would it be unwise to just leave the engine alone and restart it as is? The Kohler unit spins freely and I can feel the resistance when it goes into compression, so it isn't seized. The engine had clean oil in it and it was full, so the engine was likely run recently. I just have to get past the stuck exhaust pipe and pray I didn't warp the block with the torch or get metal shavings in the engine from cutting off the muffler (although I cut it below the exhaust port). I'm thinking rebuild the carburetor, replace the head gasket, clean and repaint the engine and try starting it with fresh oil and new ignition components. I'm thinking about doing the same for the transmission, save for removing the top cover and checking the shift forks. I already have a new clutch and steering column.

By skipping a major overhaul on the mechanical components, I feel I can get motivated again to finish this tractor and get it running sooner than I thought.
 
I've stalled on the restoration of my Cub Cadet 100 due to the usual reasons (work, kids and more pressing projects), but one of the biggest reasons is the engine. I wanted to do a full engine rebuild in line with the rest of my restoration, but a seized exhaust pipe has put me off of trying to do any further work on the engine. I cut the muffler off with a hacksaw and soaked the pipe with three kinds of penetrating oil and tried heating it with a propane torch to no avail. This defeat, coupled with the fact I don't have a budget for a micrometer set and engine assembly tools at the moment lead me to try and find an engine shop in my area to rebuild the engine professionally. All the shops in the area won't touch it; they claim it is too old, they can't get parts (even though I have a source) or "they don't do that kind of work anymore" is the usual excuse.

So, with all this in mind, would it be unwise to just leave the engine alone and restart it as is? The Kohler unit spins freely and I can feel the resistance when it goes into compression, so it isn't seized. The engine had clean oil in it and it was full, so the engine was likely run recently. I just have to get past the stuck exhaust pipe and pray I didn't warp the block with the torch or get metal shavings in the engine from cutting off the muffler (although I cut it below the exhaust port). I'm thinking rebuild the carburetor, replace the head gasket, clean and repaint the engine and try starting it with fresh oil and new ignition components. I'm thinking about doing the same for the transmission, save for removing the top cover and checking the shift forks. I already have a new clutch and steering column.

By skipping a major overhaul on the mechanical components, I feel I can get motivated again to finish this tractor and get it running sooner than I thought.
My CC102 (circa 1967) has the same K241 engine. Got it two years ago from the original owner. Like you I first looked at the exhaust pipe thinking it can't be any good. And like you, that pipe ain't coming off, even with heat. When replacing the muffler I saw the thickness of the exhaust pipe steel and thought IH built things to last, why am I worried. Bear in mind that this pipe won't rust away on the inside. Looks like there's enuf thread left to mount a muffler.
Lotsa luck, Jack
 
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