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Ok guys. Help a fellow out
Rotella says it is a diesel oil
What difference in the oil makes it a diesel oil.
If it's T4 or T6, yes it is. Regular dino oil for diesel engines is low ash, as is Cub Cadets oil and many others.
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That's for environmental protection. The cardboard box is easier to recycle and the bag is less plastic than a bottle.
I too figured it was some eco B. S. . Now one has to find an additional container to dump the old oil. Like switching from paper bags to plastic, to save tree a but now we are back to paper. Knee jerk politics
 
Is it still suggested to use a straight weight, if so can someone tell me why. Just curious.
Earl LaMott

It mostly comes down to running clearances. Here's my recent post:


There's more to "zinc" than just boundary protection or cam protection. It is used also as an anti-oxidant, among others, for protection of oil from thermal breakdown. I don't think it will ever go away completely and most good oils have it already in their additive package. That's mainly why I do not condone doping good oil with off the shelf additives. The chemistry can get messed up.

As to viscosity, we really need to focus on what's printed in the Owner's Manual. Sure the oil has changed, but the engines have morphed as well. As air cooled goes, these engines used to have looser fits and why the OEMs often pointed out in their lube tables that going anything thinner than the 1st choice may increase oil consumption such as going 10-30 instead of straight 30 for operating temps between 32* and 100* outside.

Checking build specs, the K series for example, there were 3 styles of pistons. Style A had a .007"-.010" cylinder clearance, C&D styles had .003"-.005". Even water cooled truck engines would have piston diameters over 4" before they get that close to that clearance while ours are barely 3 to 3 3/4". That's a lot of slopp'in piston rock'in go'in on at start up until things warm up and expand. I would want some oil body to cushion the gap. Now granted as things get colder outside the viscosity requirement drops, but it's all relative and there will still be "thickness".

For comparison the Kohler 7500 series manuals recommend 10-30, but their piston fits are only .0007-.002" clearance. That's right, 3 zeros is not a typo.

The Command Pro commercial series recommends 10-30 or 20-50 oil depending on service and ambient temps. 2 styles of pistons are listed: A with a .0015-.003" fit and a B with .0007" - .002".

The Kohler website does not list which oil to use, instead they simply tell you to find it in the Owner's Manual, there are just to many variables, engines, and OEM requirements so that is where truth is, the Owner's Manual.

So just with an overview I can see older engines with looser fits need thicker if not also straight weight oils and adjusted to conditions such as outside temps.
Newer engine designs have tighter fits and work well with more modern oils particularly multi-viscosity and synthetic blends.

One way that multi-vis oils are better than straight viscosity is if there isn't any straight weight. Then some lube is better than no lube, again guided by an Owner's Manual.
 
Diesel oils have a different additive package thant oils for gasoline engines. I've read that the Diesel oils have a higher levels of detergent to neutralize acids and clean oiled surfaces, and higher levels of anti-wear additives (ZDDP for instance). I was "warned" some years ago at a trade show during chit-chat with a district rep for a lube oil major that the additive packages differ a good bit between diesel oils and that it would be wise to pick one or another of those oils and stick with it. Also reminded by that rep that in gasoline engines, if that engine is burning oil somewhat then the additives will likely, over time, poison the catalytic converter (supposedly confirmed that while the industry was looking at a 'diesel or gas engine oil' for a while. They nixed that idea. I have no details.).
 
If it's T4 or T6, yes it is. Regular dino oil for diesel engines is low ash, as is Cub Cadets oil and many others.
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Finally, a simple answer to a simple question. Not a long-winded reply explaining recommended oils in late model engines, catalytic converters, etc.. As I said before, too much information becomes misinformation. I wish topics would stick to what pertains to the title of this forum, "International Cub Cadet", with one exception, early MTD Cub Cadets.
 
I have a 129 and I use a straight 30 for the summer and for the winter I use a 5-30. My question is: a straight weight oil was always recommended, which I have been doing. Is it still suggested to use a straight weight, if so can someone tell me why. Just curious.
Earl LaMot

This is the OP's original question that started this thread. Post 2 was the simple answer. Post 25 was why I thought so. They were both on target.

You're welcome
 
I have a 129 and I use a straight 30 for the summer and for the winter I use a 5-30. My question is: a straight weight oil was always recommended, which I have been doing. Is it still suggested to use a straight weight, if so can someone tell me why. Just curious.
Earl LaMott
I have a CC102, Kohler K241 engine.
Went to kohler.com, dialed their phone and spoke to a tech with a question: Is there ONE oil that satisfies the needs of every Kohler engine in our 43,000 Cubs, like 15W40? He answered that 15W40 is for diesels, 30wt is for older engines and 10W30 for newer ones. Period.
Have used both 30wts and did see some blue smoke on startup with 10W30.
Cheers, Jack
 
I know zinc is important
I ruined an Isky cam in my 354 Hemi because of lack of proper zinc level

In that situation yes. In a K-series, I doubt it matters. I have never, ever heard of a cam going flat in a K-series from using oil without ZDDP. The valve springs in a small engine are VERY soft compared to a car engine...
 
I have a classic car retoration business. We have some waste oil and gasoline. We use Safety Clean to pick up this stuff. They came this week and took off 10 gallons of oil gasoline. They charged $19.33 per gallon! Is that robbery or not. We will just keep the gasoline and use it on a burn pile or something.
 
Just dig a hole in the ground like our Grandfathers did
That's where the oil comes from anyway, you would just be recycling it back to where it came from... Just kidding of course! Our local land fill takes it free of charge and I believe there are a few other legal sites to leave it around the small town I live in. The thing is I think it all goes to people with a used oil burning furnace. I don't see how that can be any better.
 
WalMart’s auto center accepts used waste oil from individuals, free of charge. I just use a couple of milk jugs when I turn it in, so as to avoid needing to get the container back from them.
They just ask ya to log a name & address and # of quarts. Easy peasy!
 
Safety Kleen highway Robbery! We also have auto business. To get the drains cleaned out is outrageous
Govt regulations always means BIG$$$
what do they say? It's for your safety. Sure it is.
My dad used to pour the oil over the fence posts. That fence is approx 50 years old. Still standing
 

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