• If you're having trouble logging into your account , you can Reset Password
Kirk Engines, Inc Cub Cadet Used Parts CADET CONNECTION Cub Cadet Specialties Cub Cadet Specialties

Mig Welder size?

Help Support IH Cub Cadet Forum:

jmacdonald

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 8, 2006
Messages
194
displayname
James MacDonald
Thinking of a MIG welder, and since a lot of people on here restore Cub Cadets I am seeking your expert opinions on sizing the MIG. My cubs are models 70, 123 and 125. Researching it seems the biggest issue people have is buying to small. Is there also a problem with going to big?
My gut leads my to the Millermatic 140, 190 or the 211(because of promotions), and also similar sized Lincolns.
 

mfrade

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 18, 2000
Messages
1,725
Location
New Bedford, MA
displayname
Mike Frade
Can't go wrong with either the blue or red machine. I've got the Lincoln myself. Runs on 220 single phase. Or I can change the wiring setup and go 110 single phase.

Buying a unit to small is just as bad as getting one that is to large... what is your targeted metal? Or, like many of us.. just doing "projects" with a wide range of thicknesses / gauges. It was for that reason I decided to get a machine that would handle "regular" sheet metals such as found on cars and then good for maybe 3/8" thick.

Not that I do much with that thickness, but every once in awhile - a project comes along and it's nice to know I can handle it without making multiple passes.
 

sblunier

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 4, 2006
Messages
4,674
displayname
Steve Blunier "Mr. Plow" (Central IL)
I had a Hobart 135 (120V) machine on gas. TOO SMALL. Bought a Miller 210 (now 211)......220V AWESOME machine.

Arc quality is sooooo much better on 220V with higher duty cycle.

At minimum, buy the 220V suitcase unit (like the Hobart 175/185, Miller 180/190, or equal Lincoln)

Miller, Lincoln, or Hobart (cheaper version of Miller) will serve you fine.

Welders are like sheds....you outgrow them fast if you don't go big enough!!!
 

jmacdonald

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 8, 2006
Messages
194
displayname
James MacDonald
Thanks guys. Sounds like I am on the right track. From the looks of it both Lincoln and Miller must dictate the retail prices as no matter where you look the prices are very close.
I've also checked Craigslist, and it's like a lot of things people want pretty much what a new unit would cost.

Mike not completely sure on the metal thickness, but yes I see myself doing other projects that's why I don't want to paint myself into a corner on my first purchase.
 

mfrade

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 18, 2000
Messages
1,725
Location
New Bedford, MA
displayname
Mike Frade
James, I know the feeling. That's why I wanted to be able to use 120 volt or 220 volts.

I can haul the unit into the fields and make a repair useing a small generator. Has it happened? No.. but the potential is there and I like the flexibility.

I also have a Lincoln "tombstone" AC 225 stick machine, it was my first welder and is still my go to machine. Only because I have so many hours running it..

I agree with you on the pricing too, seems folks want as much as a new unit and theirs could be 5 years old!

I've had a few folks tell me their chinese import was bought cheap and ran well for years, but I prefer buying onshore products and knowing help is around the corner if ever needed.
 

jmacdonald

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 8, 2006
Messages
194
displayname
James MacDonald
Just to add to the mix I just saw an as for an upcoming auction that includes a Millermatic 212.
Looks like it will weld as small as 22 GA. Not sure it's a good fit for me, but if it is I was toying with the idea of driving down to see what if might sell for. What gauge do you think the hoods on the old Cadet are? I think that's the smallest I can imagine welding.

Can you tell yet that I am driving myself crazy?
 

mfrade

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 18, 2000
Messages
1,725
Location
New Bedford, MA
displayname
Mike Frade
I'm not overly familiar with the Miller line but, when doing sheet metals, like a CC hood., most guys do overlying "spot" welds, that is, add a spot weld, then move a couple inches and add another spot, then move a couple inches and add another spot. rinse and repeat!

The goal is to add spots of weld to close up the gap and waiting long enough in between to keep heat down to prevent warping. There are many videos on youtube showing this technique. Works well and helps keep additional bodywork to a minimum.
 

mgonitzke

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 4, 2006
Messages
3,505
displayname
Matt Gonitzke
The hood and side panels on my 782 are no thinner than 20ga and might be 18...too many paint layers to tell for sure
happy.gif


I did a bunch of research and eventually ended up buying a Miller Multimatic 200 last month. I primarily wanted a MIG welder, but want to be able to do stick once in awhile and learn TIG. This ended up being far cheaper than buying 3 welders. If you buy new, you may consider buying from www.cyberweld.com, as you won't pay shipping (or sales tax unless you live in NJ or AZ, which adds a lot to the price of a $1500+ purchase), and they also have some rebates and stuff that can bring the price down further. I saved a large amount of money buying from them instead of my local welding supply.
 

jmacdonald

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 8, 2006
Messages
194
displayname
James MacDonald
Guys I apologize for not responding to my own post. Crazy busy here trying to finish off my garage, and finally have something heated to work in. The Millermatic 212 auction was a bust. The price started at $500, and flew by me like a jet plane. Buyer paid a couple of hundred bucks off of new. I finally opted for a new Millermatic 211 (the older transformer model). Any day now I should be receiving my free spool gun, and my $400 rebate. Getting ready to wire in my 220V outlet.
 

mfrade

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 18, 2000
Messages
1,725
Location
New Bedford, MA
displayname
Mike Frade
Good for you J.M.! I hope you enjoy every moment with your purchase, be patient and get as much practice as you can. But most important.. enjoy the ride, welding is a blast and fixing your own with the new tool.. well it won't get much better than that..
talker.gif
 

Latest posts



Top