• FIRST AND LAST NAMES ARE REQUIRED WHEN REGISTERING

Wood splitting

IH Cub Cadet Tractor Forum

Help Support IH Cub Cadet Tractor Forum:

dware

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 2, 2013
Messages
125
Location
Central Virginia
displayname
David Ware
I like my Taylor Water stove . It is out in the yard 50' from the house . Hot water (165° ) is circulated to the baseboard radiators for heat. No wood trash or ashes to deal with in the house and no fire Hazzard in the house .
 

PACub100

Well-known member
IHCC Supporter
Joined
Dec 8, 2019
Messages
939
Location
Woodbury, Pennsylvania
I would like an outdoor furnace as well someday, but my opinion is that I'd have a freestanding woodstove first as they operate without electricity. Sure a generator can assist but that's another significant dollar amount, plus the need for gas to have in the event that there's an extended period of time without power...
I like the idea of keeping all the dirt / insects / bark and wood pcs outside and the safety of it as well. But I really enjoy having my pedestal stove radiating on a cold winter day. It's also nice to hang my coveralls next to after spending time outside running the snowthrower on my 1450. (y):cool:(y)
 

kshultz

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 16, 2006
Messages
1,446
Location
Indiana
displayname
Shultzie
Jackson learned a little bit about wood splitting this weekend. I don't know how many times I've told him to keep his fingers out of there. This applies when someone else is running the splitter too. He'll be fine. I don't think he's gonna do that again. :errrr: 10 stitches.
IMG_7920.JPG

Img_7922.jpg
 

-CӞ

Well-known member
IHCC Supporter
Joined
Jul 24, 2022
Messages
303
Location
Kansas
displayname
Chris “CӞ” Claussen
saw this on an ad.
anyone ever use something similar?


my uncle used to split wood with a similar “bit” mounted to the 5-lug wheel hub of his jeep.
 

Greg Riutzel

Well-known member
IHCC Supporter
Joined
Jul 9, 2020
Messages
241
Location
Lebanon, Oregon
Thousands of better mousetraps and better wood splitters fill the ads. The ads make them look easy and more effecient, and if you're observant the wood the ads use is usually a straight grain soft wood. Out here in the PNW we have a lot of fir which is usually nice but boy that hemlock can be stringy and tough and I've buried wedges and the maul in a 30" round of hemlock before it even cracked. Maple is a great wood, lasts and leaves little ash but some of those trees have curvy grain (fiddle back) that I have to work the splitter several times to get decent sized stove wood. At the end of the day it's the tried and true wedge that beats them all whether on a handle or at the end of a ram. Now ram height on today's power splitters has me wondering what market they're targeting. I still get an assortment of wood including 30" logs and I can't see myself lifting a 18" long 30" round up that high, it's sometimes hard enough rolling one on the splitter I have.
 

Latest posts

Top