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dschwandt

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David Schwandt
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jkoenig

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Jim Koenig Halfway between Harvester, MO and Cadet, MO
This brings to mind a question I have had for a few years. My experience is with VW/Audi 1.8 turbos. Often when one of those turbos goes out to lunch, they suck the oil out of the engine, and the owner needs an entire new engine. Is this common on other engines?

The question:
Should a turbo have its own oil source to preserve the engine.
 

Daniel Wiser

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Dw89xj
This brings to mind a question I have had for a few years. My experience is with VW/Audi 1.8 turbos. Often when one of those turbos goes out to lunch, they suck the oil out of the engine, and the owner needs an entire new engine. Is this common on other engines?

The question:
Should a turbo have its own oil source to preserve the engine.
I've read tale of guys just filling them full of oil and sealing it shut for small engines. I'm sure the longevity goes out the window. I don't have much turbo experience, even the few diesels I've had were non turbo old idi international 6.9 and 7.3s
 

snicklas

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Scott Nicklas
This brings to mind a question I have had for a few years. My experience is with VW/Audi 1.8 turbos. Often when one of those turbos goes out to lunch, they suck the oil out of the engine, and the owner needs an entire new engine. Is this common on other engines?

The question:
Should a turbo have its own oil source to preserve the engine.

I'm not sure on those specific models, but turbos in general (my turbo experience is in diesels and my 3.5EB F-150) but...

If a turbo fails, I've seen them fail in a couple of ways...

One, the bearing wears, and most turbos have a "sleeve" type bearing (think rod or main bearing) that is driven by oil pressure and the shaft of the turbo runs in this bearing. If the bearing starts to wear, the wheels can rub the housing.... which at best, makes a little noise and you stop. Worst, the wheel, or wheels, or CHRA explodes and send shrapnel into the intake... or even puncture the housing. (Remember, the wheels in a turbo are turning at tens of thousands of RPM's.......)

Two, the oil seals in the center section fail. Remember, the turbo is fed from the oil pump in the engine and is pressurized inside the center section of the turbo. If one of these seals fail, it can indeed push oil into the turbo and into the engine. On a gasser, I could see them have a bunch of oil smoke in the exhaust (but the cats might clean it up a bit) and you could run the engine dry. On a diesel, this puts crankcase oil into the intake, and in a diesel, that oil is now fuel.... so the engine can run away (ungoverned rpm increase, since it is oil being pushed into the intake and not fuel through the injectors) until the engine either runs out of oil... or normally catastrophic failure (send engine parts into orbit)... If your lucky and can block off the air intake and suffocate the engine, you might be able to save it....

I know someone that had a turbo seal leak, (very minor leak) that when he changed out the turbo, there was oil in the intake of the engine that he had to clean out.
 

Daniel Wiser

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I'm not sure on those specific models, but turbos in general (my turbo experience is in diesels and my 3.5EB F-150) but...

If a turbo fails, I've seen them fail in a couple of ways...

One, the bearing wears, and most turbos have a "sleeve" type bearing (think rod or main bearing) that is driven by oil pressure and the shaft of the turbo runs in this bearing. If the bearing starts to wear, the wheels can rub the housing.... which at best, makes a little noise and you stop. Worst, the wheel, or wheels, or CHRA explodes and send shrapnel into the intake... or even puncture the housing. (Remember, the wheels in a turbo are turning at tens of thousands of RPM's.......)

Two, the oil seals in the center section fail. Remember, the turbo is fed from the oil pump in the engine and is pressurized inside the center section of the turbo. If one of these seals fail, it can indeed push oil into the turbo and into the engine. On a gasser, I could see them have a bunch of oil smoke in the exhaust (but the cats might clean it up a bit) and you could run the engine dry. On a diesel, this puts crankcase oil into the intake, and in a diesel, that oil is now fuel.... so the engine can run away (ungoverned rpm increase, since it is oil being pushed into the intake and not fuel through the injectors) until the engine either runs out of oil... or normally catastrophic failure (send engine parts into orbit)... If your lucky and can block off the air intake and suffocate the engine, you might be able to save it....

I know someone that had a turbo seal leak, (very minor leak) that when he changed out the turbo, there was oil in the intake of the engine that he had to clean out.
This reminds me of when I was in tech school and we had a runaway 2 stroke Detroit, I've never heard such a noise since lol
 
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