• FIRST AND LAST NAMES ARE REQUIRED WHEN REGISTERING

Replaced tires on the 1450.........tubes?

Help Support IH Cub Cadet Forum:

jstewart

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 6, 2007
Messages
58
displayname
jon stewart
I put a new tire on the 1450 and did it tubeless, but it won't stay up over about a week, are tubes a necessity? I got the tires from Miller Tire
 

dschwandt

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 31, 2012
Messages
4,344
displayname
David Schwandt
You probably have rust and crud on the sealing bead portion of the wheel/rim.
Most tire shops should have sealer of some sort to treat that area providing it has been well cleaned and smoothed.

If this is a rear tire and you plan on filling it w/fluid, I'd say a tube is a must.
 

jkoenig

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 14, 2002
Messages
968
displayname
Jim Koenig Halfway between Harvester, MO and Cadet, MO
I have a tube that slipped in one of my rear tires. Now I can't air it up. Are there tubes with the valve stem in the proper location for our wheels? These are in the center, and did not want to fit in the first place.
 

jstewart

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 6, 2007
Messages
58
displayname
jon stewart
I had a can of bead sealer here, don't recall whether I used any when I mounted it (front tire) As I recall, the one I replaced was tubeless. I've even wiped some silicone sealer where the bead seats with good result in the past. I've even seen some tire lube for mounting tires, that when it dries acts as an adhesive for the bead area. That would be handy on these
 

dfrisk

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 12, 2001
Messages
6,317
displayname
Dennis Frisk
Besides my well honed skill of repairing tubed tractor, wagon, hayrack, and even semi-truck tires, I was tire, wheel, and rim Buyer/Scheduler at IH'S FARMALL plant about 2-1/2 years. I used 16 (sixteen) semi-truck loads of tires, wheels, & rims every DAY. Daily production rate varied from 125 to 145 tractors per day during that time. ALL 2wd tractor front tires were tubeless, all variations of 15.5x38's and 18.4x34's were tubeless, 6 ply, 8 ply, R-1 and R-2 tread. Probably got more Good-Year tires than any other brand, the big Mexican Taco Tractor orders were ALL Good-Year including the matching mounted duals ordered for each tractor. ALL tube-type tires came with tubes installed and a pound or two of air added to hold them in place.
Every day the guys with the yard tractors, big Hydro tractors with 3-pr hitch mounted lifting rigs that picked up the front ends of tractors and towed them around like 2-wheel carts would bring back into the plant the tractors from the day before with flat front tires, the line would quickly swap the flat for a new tire&rim. Occasionally there'd be a 15.5 or 18.4x34 flat, they would bring those in too. Overall I would say tubeless tire flats were around 5% of total tubeless tires with BRAND NEW RIMS AND TIRES. Toss some rust, flaking paint, previously mounted tires and the flat percentage goes up higher. Tube'd tires were around 1%, maybe a bit less. They would mount a new tube-type tire on a rim and replace the flat, the tire room supervisor gave me his shopping list of tubes to bring in about once a month, to replace pinched tubes or tubes that simply leaked.
. My Brand New Zero Turn mower, I drove it off the trailer, around the driveway, salesman who delivered it gave me a 5 minute question/answer session, he left, I mowed. I parked the new mower in the garage when I was done. Next morning the right rear tire was flat. I bought a new tube, but instead of airing it up every time I mow, I air it up maybe once a month now, brand new tire, brand new wheel. I happen to know Deere Horicon has about the exact same percentage of flats with brand new tires & wheels.
But with VERY few exceptions, like my Pronovost tandem axle dump cart, and wife's car and my pickup, every tire that I own has an inner tube, both Farmall's, all three CC tractors, my small cart. On ALL tires that run 25 mph or less there's no down side to tubes other than cost, and the Hassel of patching a tube vs plugging a tubeless tire. BUT good luck plugging a frt or rear 2 ply tire on a Cub Cadet. A patch would be my choice.
Lots of people don't agree with me on my use of inner tubes. Doesn't bother me at all. I don't have to deal with the flats.
The ready-mix company I drove for 2 summers in college driver's had to fix their own flats, except if it was the Super-Singles on the frt axle, they had a spare the driver installed and a tire truck fixed the flat. They had all the right tools, a cage, etc. to do it safely. The company I drove semi for had a full time and a part time tire guy.
I've actually had two tires blow-out on my sitting still, tube-type frt tire on my #72 I had just parked in the shop when I finished mowing, and my old small cart, tube-type, had just moved a light load of tree branches and parked on the driveway. New tire & tube.
 

jlord

Active member
Joined
Jul 29, 2016
Messages
40
Location
Burbank, CA & also Josephine county, OR.
displayname
Jim Lord
On my 1976 1650 with an FEL "Work Horse" kit on it, I run tubes front and back because I load the rear tires with used anti-freeze to give me extra rear down weight in addition to the 100 lbs. of wheel weights.
Also have a weight box I built off the 3-point hitch to load with 200 lbs. of solid concrete block as a counter weight to offset front bucket loads.
I like the loaded tires as it puts less weight on the wheel bearings. Less stress on them the better.
 

Todd Utherland

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 9, 2021
Messages
110
Location
Phoenix, Az.
If a tube's valve-stem will be perfectly aligned and the tire is going to be used in an *off-road* capacity, I prefer tubes in the tires with "Slime" in the tubes.

I have taken a tire off with Slime in the tube and stopped counting at a FULL 3 dozen complete punctures and it did not go flat... Just time to change out the tire.

Sure Slime can be messy the first time you clean up a rim but it has been WELL worth the trouble.

Secondly, I like tubes in the tires of many vehicles also to keep from attending to broken beads on complete flats. In the case of a lawn tractor, motorcycle, etc.. one can get a completely flat tire up & running with a bicycle pump. No ether, hair-spray or straps involved.

If, however, a tube's valve-stem is NOT perfectly situated for that rim - things can be SO much worse.
 
Top