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Refurb and Modification of 1430 Lawn Tractor

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jchamberlin

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Jeremiah Chamberlin
Mark: I agree, a dedicated pipe bender doesn't take up much space in the shop and some jobs just can't be done without it. I wonder if anyone has posted anything in the Tool Shop thread.
 

aaytay

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Home of the Plow Special
"Come to think of it, a bender would have been nice while I was re-plumbing the house with 150ft of copper; probably could've saved a lot of hours welding tees and elbows..... "

Mark-
Copper doesn't bend. It will crack. Cross that one off your list of uses for a pipe-bender.
 

mtarsus

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Mike Terrizzi
Hey guys,

Sorry I haven't been around -- got a new job, found a new tenant, also preparing for hunting season. Basically a lot of stuff coming at me and no time to really think about the mower.


I bought the pipe bender, but it is useless for my purpose. It just kinks the tubing, I believe it is suited for thicker pipe. For that reason, I have decided to keep the stock mufflers at least until next year.

However, I have noticed that the engine is consistently very difficult to start. I tested the compression today, and the values are equally low....

It takes 10 cranks to hit 60-90PSI. I am assuming that is not very good, yes? It should be hitting that level within the first 4 or 5 cranks. I believe that the engine is just really old and has many many hours on it.

Using this for a snowblower is going to be a real issue, because it will be next to impossible for me to start it in the winter time. I will have to wrap the battery with one of those blankets, and also us a little magnetic block heater (more $$ into the bottomless pit)

For that reason, I am thinking about using some of that Restore stuff. You know, the blue chemical that comes in a silver can. I've read a lot of good reviews about it. From what I've gathered, it won't make a new engine out of it, but it will certainly improve compression enough to make starting it easier.

Do you have any ideas or input?
 

mtarsus

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Mike Terrizzi
EDIT:

I did some more reading about how to do a proper compression test. Now that I understand it I have tested it correctly. Each cylinder is giving about 70PSI. 70PSI is low but it is not awful when all things are considered.

I am going to get a can of Restore, change the oil and add it. I will then let it run for about 20 minutes, and I will test the compression again afterward. Does that sound like a good test?
 

mtarsus

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Mike Terrizzi
Alright, as I explained in my previous post, I performed the experiment using the Restore additive...

I emptied all of the oil from the engine (it was dark brown after only 10-15 hours of use, which surprised me). Then I mixed 10oz of Restore with 5w-30 high mileage oil and filled the crank case.

I fired it up, parked it way down at the end of the yard, and let it run for 20 minutes at full throttle. It consumed 1/8 of a tank of gas, and as usual it steadily puffed/popped from the exhaust every 6-10 seconds -- this is something that is has been doing for a while and I am not sure how to get it to stop.

Once it had served its time, I brought it back into the shed, killed the engine and let it cool down for about 4-6 hours.

I tested the compression again, and it has improved by 10PSI in each cylinder. Seems like a success to me, but I think it will need much more time to really see a substantial improvement.

I am going to let it accrue about 3-5 hours of run time, then I will cut the oil with Seafoam, let it run a while and then change it. Depending on what I find in the oil and from the compression test, I will either run another round of Restore, or I will simply fill it with fresh oil.
 

mtarsus

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Mike Terrizzi
I found that the popping/puffing was actually mild backfiring. The plugs indicated a slightly lean mix, so I adjusted the carb. Now they are that perfect, toasty marshmallow color and the engine runs great. I know that it is probably the placebo effect, but I think the engine is already easier to start.

I have also found that there is a trick to starting it. I have to pull the choke, crank it, then push the choke in, and pull it out once again while the engine turns. It fires up every time when I use this trick. If I simply pull out the choke and crank it, then it does not want to start very well. For some reason it just needs that quick punch of leaner mix.

This mower runs really well, though. The 3-turn steering column is like a perfect match for this platform, and the Mag20 makes it into a very stout machine. I believe it will work very well as a snowblower. This is the first time in years that I have actually been eager for winter.
Shift.gif
 

kmcconaughey

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Kraig McConaughey
Mark, I've not heard of Restore, but I have heard of a product called "Ring Free" which is a Yamaha product. Supposed to reduce carbon build up in the rings. Not sure if it works or not. Sounds like the Restore has worked some for you.
thumbsup.gif
 

mtarsus

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Mike Terrizzi
http://www.amazon.com/Restore-8-Cylinder-Formula-Restorer-Lubricant/dp/B000AM8BCC/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top


It comes in different size containers depending on engine volume (described by number of cylinders). I did a lot of reading about it, it has "CSL" in it, which stands for Copper, Silver, and Lead. I am not sure if the metals are mixed with one another into an alloy, or if there are simply particles of each mixed freely. It is a suspension with SAE 30W oil, and a blue dye added to it, which changes color after it has run through the engine for a while.

I have read nothing but good reviews for this stuff. The caveat is that you can't used it in newer engines that have VVT, because they have very small tubes/passages that can be plugged by this product. It is also not going to fix serious issues like a rod knock. It's good for any simply designed engine that just has a lot of miles on it and is starting to get tired.
 

nbextermueller

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Nic Bextermueller
I used Restore once in an old Ford 302 in my first truck. It was well worn out. We used it as directed and with in 500 miles it had completely destroyed the oil pump, and with little oil being pushed, quickly seized the engine on the way to work one day.

I will never touch another can of that stuff.

It is coating your engine in that horrible CSL stuff. I do everything to keep the oil clean. Why on earth would dumping a can of metal bits in it be a good idea.

I'm fairly certain if you sea foam that engine, we will wash out everything you just deposited, leaving your engine more worn and worse than when you started.
 

nbextermueller

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Nic Bextermueller
Mark, no. Hopefully you'll get plenty of time out of it. Just don't sea foam it. Do your regular oil changes and the restore will do it's job. Just don't expect it to run like you just gave it a fresh rebuild.

The stuff is in there doing what it is supposed to do. Just leave it and give that snow hell.

Have you named this monster yet?
 

mtarsus

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Mike Terrizzi
I haven't given it an official name. Though on numerous occasions I have referred to it as "That F&%#in' Thing" as I point to it and my neighbor chuckles. When I've tried to think of a name, nothing seems to fit.
 

mtarsus

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Mike Terrizzi
The name Jareb seemed like a good one to me. It's a Hebrew name which means "he will struggle," or to the effect of "to rise in the face of contention," or "put up with a lot of crap to get where you're going." After 2-3 months, close to a G in materials and a couple hundred man hours, I would say it has been exactly that.
 

jchamberlin

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Jeremiah Chamberlin
I like "FrankenBlower" since it is purpose-built for snow blowing, however "Jareb" seems like a good moniker for you, Mark; you have certainly contended and come out (almost) on top.
Can we call you Mark "Jareb" Tarsus or MJT for short?
smile.gif
 

jstertz

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joshua donald stertz
I like Jeff's suggestion of FrankenBlower! Classic. The description or meaning of Jerub sure applies here though!
 

mtarsus

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Mike Terrizzi
Jeremiah,

My middle name is, in fact, Joseph, so I think that MJT is perfectly fine!

Thanks for your constant help and support
tongue.gif
 

mtarsus

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Mike Terrizzi
I have decided to call it The Snowmonster.

Today was the first day that I found practical use for it, as a plow to push leaves into the creek beside my house. It also throws the leaves fairly well, but it was impractical to use it like that. It's a beefy little mower, felt as though it would easily push a large pile of leaves if I gave it full speed from the hydro, but I am wary of overworking the little transmission, as it was clearly not designed to support even half of the crap I've attached to it.
 

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