• FIRST AND LAST NAMES ARE REQUIRED WHEN REGISTERING

PTO Clutch

IH Cub Cadet Tractor Forum

Help Support IH Cub Cadet Tractor Forum:

jparsons

Member
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Messages
19
displayname
John Parsons
"The 3 cone point screws lock the PTO between the internal snap ring and the back side of the bearing proper." Yes I knew that, my thoughts were that because I only had two of the three cone point screws contacting the backside of the bearing, the whole PTO was likely to wobble when the brake was applied and the thrust button therefore did not depress the springs. I maybe be totally confused about the effect on the mechanism when the PTO is not snugged firmly against the bearing but that is my layman's deduction. Am I wrong? Thanks!
 

mfrade

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 18, 2000
Messages
2,505
Location
New Bedford, MA
displayname
Mike Frade
I doubt it could wobble as the brake would be pushing against it. If the button did not act against the springs, the clutch would stay engaged and continue to rotate the pto.
 

jparsons

Member
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Messages
19
displayname
John Parsons
"If the button did not act against the springs, the clutch would stay engaged and continue to rotate the pto." That comment seems to confirm my diagnosis because my problem is that the clutch stays engaged and does continue to rotate the PTO when I apply the brake against the button.

I have studied the diagram of the PTO extensively and watched youtube videos on the PTO and I still do not exactly understand how pressure on the springs translates into he clutch disengaging the PTO. How the heck does that work mechanically?
 

bwstevens

Well-known member
IHCC Supporter
Joined
Sep 14, 2015
Messages
236
Location
Johnson city NY
displayname
Brian W. Stevens
It's going to be hard to explain. The spring or springs push on the three levers which in turn pull on the bolts which pulls the steel plate against the fiber disk and towards the pulley casting. Press on the button and the levers move to loosen the three bolts .
 

jparsons

Member
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Messages
19
displayname
John Parsons
It's going to be hard to explain. The spring or springs push on the three levers which in turn pull on the bolts which pulls the steel plate against the fiber disk and towards the pulley casting. Press on the button and the levers move to loosen the three bolts .
That was a short but precise explanation. Thank you very much. After again studying my PTO, I now can pretty much conceptualize how this works. Very ingenious.

I still cannot see how the bearing drives the pto. I understand how the PTO is attached to the bearing (set screws and snap ring hold it in place). And I undestand how the bearing is attached to the crankshaft (bearing is attached to the collar which is attached to the crankshaft). But with the pto off, I can spin the bearing without the crankshaft spinning. What makes that bearing lock up so that its outer diameter spins and drives the PTO?

Now that I understand this thing, I think most of my problem is associated with the bearing not being flush with the end of the crankshaft. It is too far in. I'll fix that and also keep working on getting those last two set screws out of the pto but the inner cone shaped one is sheared off and the outer one has the hex socket completely destroyed by a previous owner.
 

bwstevens

Well-known member
IHCC Supporter
Joined
Sep 14, 2015
Messages
236
Location
Johnson city NY
displayname
Brian W. Stevens
The bearing is so that the pulley spins on the crankshaft. The fiber disk does the work as it is captive in the basket part . Hence the need to sandwich the pulley casting the fiber disc and the steel plate.
 

Latest posts

Top