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Pre paint prep

IH Cub Cadet Tractor Forum

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Stephen Novick

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Aug 14, 2020
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Gibsonia Pa.
It’s Funny all the young rednecks at my work. Wanted the Cub Cadet to be left alone. Just maintain it replace belts bearings and tires. But flat clear over the rust and paint. Leave it weathered.
 

mgwin

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Marty A. Gwin
Kevin,
So you are referring to Rustoleum paint, and not the primer?
The only Rustoleum I use is the grey primer, which works great.
One thing though, the Rustoleum rusty metal primer which is red is totally worthless. Well, maybe not totally. If you have something that is rusted too much to restore, and you are going to make a yard ornament out of it you could use the rusty metal primer.
 

hydroharry

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Jul 22, 2007
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Harry Bursell
Rustoleum is linseed oil based paint.. Not compatible with other paints as they are urethane enamel and have a differant chemical composition.. I have had problems with it wrinkling and fisheyeing when you try to spray enamel over it..

Kevin - is that also true of the Rustoleum "primers" like the auto primer that Marty posted?
 

kphill

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Grove City, Pa.
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Kevin Hill
Harry, You have seen pics of my 169 I restored and refinished 10 years ago and it mows 2 acres of grass every week and still looks good..
 

kmcconaughey

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Kraig McConaughey
This looks like it could be a useful thread for future reference so I'm going to make it a sticky.
 

Dan Page

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Aug 3, 2020
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Middle Sackville
Hello all, the biggest hurdle with paint is the chemical composition. Every paint manufacturer has similar products that differ slightly but you need to know what you are using from the beginning to choose what you top it with. Also you have to decide what you want for a finished product. Most aerosols are enamel or laquer. Laquer is nice and easy but it will never dry. 100 years from now you can take laquer thinner and refloat or soften it. That is why if want to make any paint last and shine you do not use laquer, it’s 50 plus year old technology. I could write pages of info on this subject as I worked in the collision industry for 27 plus years starting in the with paint that was enamel, laquer then acrylic enamel and urethane as single stage paint. After that the industry moved to base coat clear coat the last being water base and water primers with a urethane clear coat. All of this is overkill for equipment but what you want will determine the products you choose as well as where you live. I live in a salt saturated part of the world. I am surrounded by salt water putting salt in the air and salt spread on the roads in the winter. That is another consideration. Many people believe that winter’s cold is the issue when corrosion or rust tears its head. In reality it is a contributing factor but it is actually the rapid change in temperature. Salt only works when it is mildly cold but when you have -20 Celsius at night and + 5 Celsius during the day that is the culprit. Rapid change of temperature creates condensation creating that contributes to corrosion. If you live in an area where it is always hot and dry, you will get away with using basic products that would not stand up in another region. In my years working in shops I have repaired everything thing from tractors, wind tower towers, fire trucks, military surveillance test equipment to trucks highway tractors and passenger vehicles. From chevettes for those of you that remember them to Mercedes. You cannot paint them all with the same brush. The very best method that I have found in a harsh environment is media blasting followed by epoxy primer, followed by a two part urethane primer followed by paint. Now the two part urethane is only required if you need to straighten or block a panel to take out small imperfections. If you do not require that step you can go straight to paint. For equipment I have found urethane paint to be the most durable and cost effective. But that again is my experience in my climate. Personally I would not use any laquer products as someone mentioned earlier about paint shriveling and coming off. That is a laquer or enamel product reacting to a stronger more corrosive product being applied over top of it. Sometimes it’s not the paint but the reducer or thinner you use to mix the paint and there is a difference between thinner and reducer. Never wash a bare metal panel down with any solvent based product unless it is specifically designed to be used as such. Years ago they had prime wash and prep for metal but it wasn’t successful. The reason you don’t use a solvent to wash is because it leaves a residue or layer between the metal and primer you are about to apply. Do not use a rag that has a high lint or paper towel as it will leave small fibers. I hope this sheds some light on the subject. I will end here as I could continue at length but most of it would not apply.
 

kphill

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Kevin Hill
Dan, I too started as a bodyman in the 70s and agree with everything you posted.. The factory probably used straight enamel as that would be the most cost effective.. I use the auto primer in the spray cans you can get at the autobody supply store and use the Case/IH Ironguard paint and Wet Look hardener.. Seems to hold up very well.. A warning to home painters, Hardeners contain Isocyonates and should only be used in well ventalated areas with the appropriate respirator..
 

etopel

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Feb 10, 2008
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Ed Topel
The automotive Rustoleum primer Marty is using is different than regular Rustoleum primer. I'm not sure, but I think it's probably lacquer based and will work ok under automotive type paints.
 

kphill

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Jul 14, 2008
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Grove City, Pa.
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Kevin Hill
I won't try it.. Rustoleum is really a product that is pretty outdated.. There is many other products on the market that is much better... Stay with the same type of paint and you will be fine..
 
Last edited:

awoloch

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Jun 9, 2016
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156
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Anthony N. Woloch
Excellent educational discussion about automotive primers and paints. Thank you all! My 1964 IH Cub Cadet 100 tractor and mower deck still have most of their original paint, spending most of their life in the farmland country Central Illinois. Can anyone please comment on the original paints IH had used when it produced these early lawn & garden tractors in their manufacturing plant in Louisville, Kentucky? Thank you.
 

kphill

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Grove City, Pa.
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Kevin Hill
I don't know that much about the paint they originally used but I do know about the paint of that era and it contained lead.. So if you use power sanders to sand it down you should wear a dust mask to be safe.. Also the current Irongaurd paint is just as good if not better than what was originally used..
 

digger

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Digger
Rustoleum is linseed oil based paint.. Not compatible with other paints as they are urethane enamel and have a differant chemical composition.. I have had problems with it wrinkling and fisheyeing when you try to spray enamel over it..
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