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Plowing snow

IH Cub Cadet Tractor Forum

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Andrew Rokey

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Dec 8, 2022
Messages
41
Location
Illinois
Just bought a 782 with a plow, and a set of snow chains. Do I need wheel weights? Or have you guys figured out a way to get some weight on the back of the tractor? I'm assuming I'll probably need something. Thanks
 

jkoenig

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Sep 14, 2002
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Jim Koenig Halfway between Harvester, MO and Cadet, MO
My son plowed the entire neighborhood last year with 60# in each wheel, no chains. He's a little guy not getting much help from his bulk to hold it down.

As I see it, a 12" wheel is a 12" wheel. almost any wheel weight for a 12" wheel should fit., even those from the greene dealers. Shop Wheel Horse, Bolens, MTD, Craftsman, etc.

I do hope to add a few suitcase weights if I have time this year.
 

Doug Rusk

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Joined
Sep 15, 2022
Messages
99
Location
Iowa
Wheel weights are fairly universal for garden tractors. There are at least 2 different bolt patterns, tho I think that's from weights for smaller tractors with smaller wheels. Just measure your bolts directly across from each other. I think 8" bolt pattern with 12" Dia weight is what your looking for.

Several variables as far as what you can get away with. Wet heavy 16" snow will take more traction than a lite powdery 2" snow. The surface your clearing might make a difference too. I would want weights and chains I think.

I have seen weight lifting weights repurposed as wheel weights or mounted on the back as well.
 

mgwin

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Reidsville, NC
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Marty A. Gwin
Andrew,
Chains are a big help.
You could look on the local selling sites and more than likely find some OEM IH wheel weights. They usually run around $125-$150 a set. If you can get them for $100, you got a good buy. You can maybe also put a set on the inside of the rim for more weight. You need to check it first though, to make sure the brake assembly doesn't prevent you from putting them on the inside.
I prefer inner tubes to keep the liquid off of the rims inside the tire when filling with fluid. Also fill the front tires as well. If you angle the blade, the snow will want to push the front of the tractor sideways.
 

Andrew Rokey

Active member
Joined
Dec 8, 2022
Messages
41
Location
Illinois
Wheel weights are fairly universal for garden tractors. There are at least 2 different bolt patterns, tho I think that's from weights for smaller tractors with smaller wheels. Just measure your bolts directly across from each other. I think 8" bolt pattern with 12" Dia weight is what your looking for.

Several variables as far as what you can get away with. Wet heavy 16" snow will take more traction than a lite powdery 2" snow. The surface your clearing might make a difference too. I would want weights and chains I think.

I have seen weight lifting weights repurposed as wheel weights or mounted on the back as well.
Awesome answer! Thanks so much.
 

Andrew Rokey

Active member
Joined
Dec 8, 2022
Messages
41
Location
Illinois
Andrew,
Chains are a big help.
You could look on the local selling sites and more than likely find some OEM IH wheel weights. They usually run around $125-$150 a set. If you can get them for $100, you got a good buy. You can maybe also put a set on the inside of the rim for more weight. You need to check it first though, to make sure the brake assembly doesn't prevent you from putting them on the inside.
I prefer inner tubes to keep the liquid off of the rims inside the tire when filling with fluid. Also fill the front tires as well. If you angle the blade, the snow will want to push the front of the tractor sideways.
There some selling local, I just saw. They are for a 125 cub. Do you think they would work?
 

Andrew Rokey

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Joined
Dec 8, 2022
Messages
41
Location
Illinois
Good deal, thanks. Here they are
Screenshot_20221211-175056.png
 

-CӞ

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Jul 24, 2022
Messages
310
Location
Kansas
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Chris “CӞ” Claussen
Just bought a 782 with a plow, and a set of snow chains. Do I need wheel weights? Or have you guys figured out a way to get some weight on the back of the tractor? I'm assuming I'll probably need something. Thanks
And if you’re pushing snow on pavement, I’d highly recommend one of these. It’s my favorite thing I’ve added to my iHCC model 100, which is pictured here as well.
 

Bret McFarland

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Jun 30, 2022
Messages
129
Location
Western Maryland
Just bought a 782 with a plow, and a set of snow chains. Do I need wheel weights? Or have you guys figured out a way to get some weight on the back of the tractor? I'm assuming I'll probably need something. Thanks
Another alternative is a weight box to attach to the rear, if you don't want to deal with wheel weights or getting tubes and fill the tires. And it bolts on or off easily. I like it because you can put alot of weight on and for snow blowers it actually unweights the front end to offset the heavy blower. I built one out of left over rough-cut oak and put (5) 16x16 concrete pavers on ... ~200 lbs for less than $50. 25 cents per pound to fight inflation lol. Just a thought.
 
Last edited:

tkhoffman

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Oct 2, 2013
Messages
455
Location
Northern NEW YORK
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Tony Hoffman
I worked my way up when I first got my first garden tractor (this 782). It had chains on the rear do that's what I used the first year. With typically wet snow in my area, I found I would lose traction as the plow filled during 6" snowfalls. I came across 10lb wheel weights so I thru them on. I did notice some improvement. Having leftover cement after a household job I decided to make these cement discs and weld up a little Hold for them. At about 60lbs, they made a big difference when having a lot of snow in the plow. I don't think I would get any great gains by adding more weight. Maybe I'd get more traction under some circumstances but I don't feel the need for my average task. Not to mention, the less weight on the wheel bearings means less stress.
 

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tkhoffman

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Oct 2, 2013
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455
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Northern NEW YORK
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Tony Hoffman
Agreed fully. I’d still like to replace my 4-link snow chains with the better 2-link chains.
It's a funny thing, I already had 4 link when I got my Cub. Yes you do bump around a bit going down the road but if I had 2 link I do not think I could get into my garage. My floor is so shiny that, as I back in, the tractor moves while tire is touching but then skids as it slips over the chain to get tire rubber again.
 

-CӞ

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Joined
Jul 24, 2022
Messages
310
Location
Kansas
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Chris “CӞ” Claussen
I worked my way up when I first got my first garden tractor (this 782). It had chains on the rear do that's what I used the first year. With typically wet snow in my area, I found I would lose traction as the plow filled during 6" snowfalls. I came across 10lb wheel weights so I thru them on. I did notice some improvement. Having leftover cement after a household job I decided to make these cement discs and weld up a little Hold for them. At about 60lbs, they made a big difference when having a lot of snow in the plow. I don't think I would get any great gains by adding more weight. Maybe I'd get more traction under some circumstances but I don't feel the need for my average task. Not to mention, the less weight on the wheel bearings means less stress.
wheel weights & ballast in the tires are indeed ideal in that there is less stress on the machine. for this reason, i’m seeking a second set of wheel weights for the inside of my rear wheels!
that and some 2-link chains.
 

jack casey

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Joined
Jun 15, 2022
Messages
90
Location
pearl river ny
I worked my way up when I first got my first garden tractor (this 782). It had chains on the rear do that's what I used the first year. With typically wet snow in my area, I found I would lose traction as the plow filled during 6" snowfalls. I came across 10lb wheel weights so I thru them on. I did notice some improvement. Having leftover cement after a household job I decided to make these cement discs and weld up a little Hold for them. At about 60lbs, they made a big difference when having a lot of snow in the plow. I don't think I would get any great gains by adding more weight. Maybe I'd get more traction under some circumstances but I don't feel the need for my average task. Not to mention, the less weight on the wheel bearings means less stress.
Okay, call me cranky but chains are a nuisance, on for winter, off in spring. As for wheel weights you likely need 75lbs per wheel. You need help from God if a wheel needs to come off for maintenance. My former Elec-Trak had 160lbs (from a home gym weight set) on the 'back porch.' My driveway is fairly flat and the ET had Carlisle AG tires (the square shouldered model) and would move 10-12" of snow. Those tires are now on the Cub. Cub has enough ironwork out back to create a metal/wood box, something more substantial than my toolbox.
Jack
 

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