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IH Cub Cadet Tractor Forum

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mfrade

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 18, 2000
Messages
2,514
Location
New Bedford, MA
displayname
Mike Frade
So I took the top off. The valves move the piston does not. I found there is a Kohler repairman in the next town and I called him about what I have found. He says he will not work on it because it is mowing season and he is too busy. He says he put a short block in his uncles machine a few years ago but before he finished his uncle bought a new zero turn machine. So he never finished the repairs. He said he will sell me the whole motor and I should be able to take 2 and get 1 to run.
I am in deep, into unknown territory, any thoughts?

Easiest for you would be to go get that short block, It would speed up the process for you.
 

glippert

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 9, 2006
Messages
1,204
Location
Olivia, MN
displayname
Greg Lippert
Ray - Thanks for that explanation/tutorial. I only have one tractor (a 147) with a starter/generator, and it's currently in storage, but I'm sure I'll need this information eventually!
 

rleo

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 11, 2002
Messages
574
displayname
Ray Leo
1) Commutator: The commutator is the series of copper sections,separated by mica insulation. It can be cleaned with sandpaper down to about 320G (and finer). I prefer a RED Scotchbrite pad (around 500G equivalent). You can use finer grits.. it just takes longer.
2) Mica: The mica is the thin insulated sections between the copper sections that the brushes ride on. IF the copper wears down even with the mica- the brushes ride on the insulation instead of the copper. If this happens, the starter/generator may work intermittently, slowly, or stop working all together.
To repair, you must "cut back" the mica. Electrical/alternator shops have a machine to do this, but it really isn't hard to do by hand.
- Get a hacksaw blade, and you will notice the teeth are "offset"- some face right, some face left. Use a bench grinder to make the blade feel "flat"... this will also make the blade thinner. You want it as thin as the insulation (mica) sections of the commutator end of the armature. I like to wrap the end of the hacksaw blade with a little electrical tape- to make it easier to hold.
I like to hook my left thumbnail on the lip of one of the copper sections- and start the hacksaw blade against my fingernail. You want to cut the mica back (down) about 1/32". It only takes a few strokes per section. So you can easily feel the groove. Do this to all the sections. It helps to mark the 1st one with a Sharpie marker.
Note: Don't worry if you accidentally scratch the copper occassionally- it won't hurt anything. Just don't cut a groove into a section.
After you have cut the insulation back, use the sandpaper or Scotchbrite, to go over the copper sections. Then use compressed air to clean out all the grooves you just created.

Motor/Engine: These little things are simple. Follow the directions in the shop manual, and try to be extra clean during assembly.
RayF: some quotes are worth cataloging and this one is one of them. Many thanks for the explanation!
 

Imnaykid

Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2019
Messages
23
Location
Northern Illinois
Hello everyone.

Thanks for the advise to buy the other Cub. On the phone the seller said "It ran when I parked it". When I went to pick it up it was in a shed. He said to give him 5 minutes. In less then that he had it running. It has the K-161S motor.

He says I just need to swap the motors and I will have my original running. So I will get it off the truck in the morning, take photos and start pulling it apart. But I am sure I will be back here looking for more help.

Here it is:
 

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jbratton

Well-known member
IHCC Supporter
Joined
Dec 6, 2018
Messages
328
displayname
Justin Bratton
1) Commutator: The commutator is the series of copper sections,separated by mica insulation. It can be cleaned with sandpaper down to about 320G (and finer). I prefer a RED Scotchbrite pad (around 500G equivalent). You can use finer grits.. it just takes longer.
2) Mica: The mica is the thin insulated sections between the copper sections that the brushes ride on. IF the copper wears down even with the mica- the brushes ride on the insulation instead of the copper. If this happens, the starter/generator may work intermittently, slowly, or stop working all together.
To repair, you must "cut back" the mica. Electrical/alternator shops have a machine to do this, but it really isn't hard to do by hand.
- Get a hacksaw blade, and you will notice the teeth are "offset"- some face right, some face left. Use a bench grinder to make the blade feel "flat"... this will also make the blade thinner. You want it as thin as the insulation (mica) sections of the commutator end of the armature. I like to wrap the end of the hacksaw blade with a little electrical tape- to make it easier to hold.
I like to hook my left thumbnail on the lip of one of the copper sections- and start the hacksaw blade against my fingernail. You want to cut the mica back (down) about 1/32". It only takes a few strokes per section. So you can easily feel the groove. Do this to all the sections. It helps to mark the 1st one with a Sharpie marker.
Note: Don't worry if you accidentally scratch the copper occassionally- it won't hurt anything. Just don't cut a groove into a section.
After you have cut the insulation back, use the sandpaper or Scotchbrite, to go over the copper sections. Then use compressed air to clean out all the grooves you just created.

Motor/Engine: These little things are simple. Follow the directions in the shop manual, and try to be extra clean during assembly.
Great explanation. Is there anyway you can make a video?
 
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