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Kohler vs well, everybody else

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rjruchti

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Roger J. Ruchti
The B&S Intek engine were only designed to run about 500 hours. To meet the demand for the big box stores to sell cheep mowers,etc. I have had many different engine is various GT's and the only one that blew was an old single cylinder Kohler in a 782 Cub Cadet. Have a Kohler single 7 hp in a Bolens Ram and a Magnum in an 1862. Other than that will stick with the Briggs. Rebuilt an old L head to put in the 782 and put a OHV 16 hp Vanguard in the 1650 Cub. Nice to have a smooth running engine. No shaking all over the place like the old single Kohlers.
 

Todd Utherland

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The B&S Intek engine were only designed to run about 500 hours.
That's the second time this week that I have heard that number for lifespan on an item.
The other was for a *premium* off-road 4 seat, 4x4, side-by-side vehicle. When the fella told me the 500 hour life juxtaposed against the cost of them new I can't help but feel that anyone buying into them knowing that is an abject fool or simply has too doggone much money.

500 hours is essentially nothing though at least in your example - the limited life follows the cost and realistic expectations of the buyer.
 

jstewart

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jon stewart
I was under the impression that Intek was the Chineseum version of B&S, Vanguard being the American, that was some years ago that I was told that.

The same dealer told me that Kohler V twin Command was good for roughly 2000 hrs running time.
 

rjruchti

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Roger J. Ruchti
Intek was put in the cheaper versions. Average home owner would probably mow an hour a week for 4 months. 20 hours a year would be tops so they would run a few years before they fell apart. Mission accomplished.
 

dkirk

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David Kirk
I have a friend who owns a golf driving range and many years ago purchased a commercial mower powered by a Kohler K-341, 16 hp K-series engine. This machine has always had proper, on-time maintenance and the hour meter now shows approximately 4300.0 (four thousand three hundred) hours. Other than routine oil changes and ignition system maintenance, this engine has never been touched. Still running perfectly with no issues. Oil consumption is nil. The K-series, and the follow-on M-series, were produced when quality was the top priority and the engineering department was respected. Not that way any more!
 

1811Cub

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I will go one step further and add the Kohler Command series was still a quality piece. The latest offerings from them, especially the Courage, are nothing like the good ole days, which mirrors the Cub Cadets.
 

PACub100

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Back when I sold cars, the biggest thing was pushing leases. The proper way to go about it was to enforce the idea that the majority of people are looking for something new when they are about to pay off their current vehicle. And...it's true. Same thing applies, in the day of disposable items, people will buy something that will get them by for a few years, then tire of it and buy something new. It's a sick cycle in my opinion but alas, is the way of the world.
Which is why I chose to ditch my 2007 Crapsman and opt for a late 70s 1450 👍😎👍
 

Neil Mullins

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Back when I sold cars, the biggest thing was pushing leases. The proper way to go about it was to enforce the idea that the majority of people are looking for something new when they are about to pay off their current vehicle. And...it's true. Same thing applies, in the day of disposable items, people will buy something that will get them by for a few years, then tire of it and buy something new. It's a sick cycle in my opinion but alas, is the way of the world.
Which is why I chose to ditch my 2007 Crapsman and opt for a late 70s 1450 👍😎👍
I acquired my Cub 106 in 1996. I had to build a new deck (sheet metal), re-wire it & rebuild the drive & PTO clutch. Since then it has been routine maintenance oil changes grease & a very few deck drive belts. My next door neighbor has had 2 Craftsman, & now a Husqvarna. His last Craftsman, the B&S engine disintegrated inside without venting the case LOL
 

dware

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David Ware
Chinesium (sp) is a great word but in my opinion Kohler did it to themselves when they named their poc "Courage "
 

1811Cub

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Chinesium (sp) is a great word but in my opinion Kohler did it to themselves when they named their poc "Courage "

That is by far the WORST name a company could name an engine line. So stupid on many levels. It's fitting they are so bad. If Kohler keeps that crap up, they will end up like Tecumseh.
 

jstewart

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jon stewart
That is by far the WORST name a company could name an engine line. So stupid on many levels. It's fitting they are so bad. If Kohler keeps that crap up, they will end up like Tecumseh.
I've come to the conclusion that we will witness all the good brands destroy themselves.......................technology/manufacturing and the economic savings derived from, will not be enough to keep them from going under due to cheap labor and now the rampant inflation will accelerate that.
 

Todd Utherland

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I've come to the conclusion that we will witness all the good brands destroy themselves.......................technology/manufacturing and the economic savings derived from, will not be enough to keep them from going under due to cheap labor and now the rampant inflation will accelerate that.
The sad result of *MBAs* and *engineers* being hired solely for "change" or already employed and fearing that without overtly altering operations in the false-name of: change, improvement, efficiency, profit, etc... they will lose their positions.

Eventually, a truly superior product will saturate its market potential and then the MBAs and engineers come in to address the limited market for unit replacement and replacement parts sales as well as the trailing issue of repair labor.

Sadly, the response is often to DELIBERATELY de-engineeer an item to an acceptable level of failure and take the almost certain lowered manufacturing costs as icing on that toxic cake.

I recall meeting a fella once who had been head of the Hydramatic division at G.M. We naturally landed on discussing my favorite transmission of all time; The T.H. 400. I asked him why they were failing at the end of the production run years and yet were granite in the early years. He told me how they were developed and along with the manufacturing of the 400s, they had to contend with a mandated production of spare parts. Problem was, the parts were languishing on shelves as they had produced a product that was almost perfect for its application.

Enter the MBAs and engineers.
 

1811Cub

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Elkland, PA
I recall meeting a fella once who had been head of the Hydramatic division at G.M. We naturally landed on discussing my favorite transmission of all time; The T.H. 400. I asked him why they were failing at the end of the production run years and yet were granite in the early years. He told me how they were developed and along with the manufacturing of the 400s, they had to contend with a mandated production of spare parts. Problem was, the parts were languishing on shelves as they had produced a product that was almost perfect for its application.
They were/are an awesome transmission. One of the best of all time. I have had several over the years in various vehicles, and never lost one. Can't say the same for the TH350..
 

jstewart

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jon stewart
I blame the bean counters, they are ultimately handed control of a company, to balance the books and "make it work" No technical knowledge, everything is just cost savings. Most every company I worked for, was run by the accounting dept, needless to say, they were all someplace on the failure spiral. Once an investment firm buys a company, it is done for.
 

Todd Utherland

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Phoenix, Az.
I blame the bean counters, they are ultimately handed control of a company, to balance the books and "make it work" No technical knowledge, everything is just cost savings. Most every company I worked for, was run by the accounting dept, needless to say, they were all someplace on the failure spiral. Once an investment firm buys a company, it is done for.
Yup. Because.... THAT is how executive bonuses are usually generated.
 

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