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Kirk Engines, Inc Cub Cadet Used Parts CADET CONNECTION Cub Cadet Specialties Cub Cadet Specialties

Kohler M18S engine

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john.knutson

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Oct 27, 2019
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Ok then, I think I am going to do just that5. I am going to be out where the station is that I can buy the ethanol free fuel tomorrow and I will stop at tractor supply and get the 360 Marine Stabil for my tractor, thank you again.
I happened to notice my local Ace Hardware had the marine STA-BIL when I was there today. This might not be helpful for you, but for me its about a 35 minute drive difference!
 

dsarow

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Jul 13, 2014
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dean w sarow
Fresh fuel is a really important part of any small engine.30 days old and it should go in a street vehicle.
 

dramsey

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Ivesdale, IL
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D Ramsey
Looks like an accident waiting to happen in my book.

I've been running E10 gas for 15 years with no fuel related problems. As stated in earlier posts you need to run carb-fuel line dry when you are done using a small engine. I will add fuel or shake my small engine to get all the fuel components mix together again when I'm ready to use them. Good example is 2 cycle fuel. The first few ounces will be straight gas when you fill the gas tank on the engine. Oil is heavier than gas and the oil settles to the bottom of the fuel container. Same thing with ethanol.

Most if not all small engine manufactures say to buy enough fuel for 30 days or less use. When my fuel gets 30 days oil it is added to my pick up truck.
I have been doing this for over 40 years, every since my first bad experience of ethanol damaging my pure gas engines from the 50's and 60's. I am not so much concerned about the the later equipment since they were never really pure gas engines. The phase separation of the fuels in the equipment is the main reason why the carbs and tanks need drained for storage, which, as another poster mentioned, could dry out the seal components thus causing other issues. On another note, phase separation has been a serious issue for all gas stations, farmers, or anyone else that needs to store bulk amounts since day one of the ethanol introduction. I have worked for a company that developed partial solutions and additives to curtail the issue. Although most additives developed for the sole purpose of reducing phase separation are usually successful they do introduce other issues like octane reduction etc. Most of the better additives work by breaking down the molecular structure of the water and ethanol to help the mixture with gas. Also, the additives that usually work can be quite expensive.
 

tsimpson

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Apr 28, 2012
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Anthony J Simpson
If you use 91 or 93 oct. fuel you don't need to use stabilizer
 

mgonitzke

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Wichita, KS
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Matt Gonitzke
If you use 91 or 93 oct. fuel you don't need to use stabilizer
Nonsense. Premium does not equate to ethanol-free, and even ethanol-free gas will eventually go bad. All the 91 octane available in my area is 10-15% ethanol.

100LL avgas would not require stabilizer, but it costs more than ethanol-free and a jug of Sta-Bil, and the lead will sludge the oil and foul the plugs and valves, too.
 

Thomas

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Rockland, Pa. 16374
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Thomas
I have been doing this for over 40 years, every since my first bad experience of ethanol damaging my pure gas engines from the 50's and 60's. I am not so much concerned about the the later equipment since they were never really pure gas engines. The phase separation of the fuels in the equipment is the main reason why the carbs and tanks need drained for storage, which, as another poster mentioned, could dry out the seal components thus causing other issues. On another note, phase separation has been a serious issue for all gas stations, farmers, or anyone else that needs to store bulk amounts since day one of the ethanol introduction. I have worked for a company that developed partial solutions and additives to curtail the issue. Although most additives developed for the sole purpose of reducing phase separation are usually successful they do introduce other issues like octane reduction etc. Most of the better additives work by breaking down the molecular structure of the water and ethanol to help the mixture with gas. Also, the additives that usually work can be quite expensive.
 

Oak

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Oct 26, 2019
Messages
11
Location
Georgia
I'm sold on Star Tron. My HD sat for 3 years with a 1/2 tank of gas and Star Tron. My gas cock started leaking so I had to drain the fuel to replace it. What do I do with about 2 gallons of 3 year old fuel. It smelled okay so I figured it was better to get stranded on my 3205 in the yard then my bike miles from the house so it went into the Cub. I couldn't even tell any difference from fresh gas.
 

mfrade

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New Bedford, MA
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Mike Frade
I AM WONDERING IF YOU HAVE HAD ANY TROUBLE WITH THE FUEL LINES IN THOSE 15 YEARS?
Not sure who you were asking Thomas. But if you were asking me? No, no issues with fuel lines. Mine has 2 - 5 or 6 inch lengths with a fuel filter in the center. No problems noted.
 

Thomas

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Thomas
Ok very good. I was asking Dramsey cuz he said he has been doing this for 40 years and I am wondering because this ethanol garbage is really hard on the fuel lines. I have replaces them on every 2 cycle thing that I have since this crap gasoline has come out !
 

Thomas

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Rockland, Pa. 16374
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Thomas
I'm sold on Star Tron. My HD sat for 3 years with a 1/2 tank of gas and Star Tron. My gas cock started leaking so I had to drain the fuel to replace it. What do I do with about 2 gallons of 3 year old fuel. It smelled okay so I figured it was better to get stranded on my 3205 in the yard then my bike miles from the house so it went into the Cub. I couldn't even tell any difference from fresh gas.
I have used Star-Tron for a few years and it seems to be very good. I think it and Sta-Bil are both very good additives. I also have let the gas in my Zero-turn all winter with it in there and never had any trouble with it starting and running the next spring, but I do run the carb dry before I get it ready to go for the summer.
 

Thomas

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Rockland, Pa. 16374
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Thomas
One thing I was going to ask you guys that are familiar with the M18S Kohler engine. When I was replacing the fuel lines and stuff I also pulled out the sparks plugs and cleaned them. They were too white looking and I think they should be burning a little more brown. Any body have any thoughts about this. ???
 

jriese

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Mar 29, 2011
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East Concord, NY 14055
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Jeremy Riese
light brown is ideal on the spark plug if it white i say it running lean. i run k100 additive works great cleans carb that been sitting and all round good for engines
 

dramsey

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Ivesdale, IL
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D Ramsey
Ok very good. I was asking Dramsey cuz he said he has been doing this for 40 years and I am wondering because this ethanol garbage is really hard on the fuel lines. I have replaces them on every 2 cycle thing that I have since this crap gasoline has come out !
The fuel hoses on 2 cycle engines (weed eaters, chain saws etc) are junk from the start and ethanol will eat away at them and turn them into more of a gel like substance which you can squeeze between your fingers like mashed potatoes then the filters fall off the hose within the tank and also destroys the primer bulbs if equipped, however, while using non-ethanol does not usually cause these issues you still have other issues to contend with. Draining the fuel out of these 2 cycle units for storage can have an adverse effect on the fuel hoses as well. Draining them for storage can cause the hoses to dry out and become brittle thus the filter again falls off the hose and must be replaced, keep in mind ethanol fuels must be drained because any moisture at all during storage will cause phase separation creating a slimy gel in the system and plugging up everything. Over the years I had decided to be contrary to the idea of draining these non-ethanol fuel systems for storage, the 2 cycle oil mix is a blessing for storage, if I am just storing them for the winter I do not drain them and have had little to no issues but if it is going to set for a couple years then definitely drain them because the fuel will turn to varnish causing a host of issues :). The fuel hoses on my tractors usually get replaced due to external dry rot and cracking, the fuel does not really deteriorate the hoses. The fuel lines (indicating metal of course) can collect condensation while being stored but usually over a winter is not enough to cause an issue. I will add I do not use any fuel additives in my machines with the exception of lead replacements for my engines from the 50's and 60's.
 

dmerkle

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Nov 8, 2002
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Dale Merkle
The fuel hoses on 2 cycle engines (weed eaters, chain saws etc) are junk from the start and ethanol will eat away at them and turn them into more of a gel like substance which you can squeeze between your fingers like mashed potatoes then the filters fall off the hose within the tank and also destroys the primer bulbs if equipped, however, while using non-ethanol does not usually cause these issues you still have other issues to contend with. Draining the fuel out of these 2 cycle units for storage can have an adverse effect on the fuel hoses as well. Draining them for storage can cause the hoses to dry out and become brittle thus the filter again falls off the hose and must be replaced, keep in mind ethanol fuels must be drained because any moisture at all during storage will cause phase separation creating a slimy gel in the system and plugging up everything. Over the years I had decided to be contrary to the idea of draining these non-ethanol fuel systems for storage, the 2 cycle oil mix is a blessing for storage, if I am just storing them for the winter I do not drain them and have had little to no issues but if it is going to set for a couple years then definitely drain them because the fuel will turn to varnish causing a host of issues :). The fuel hoses on my tractors usually get replaced due to external dry rot and cracking, the fuel does not really deteriorate the hoses. The fuel lines (indicating metal of course) can collect condensation while being stored but usually over a winter is not enough to cause an issue. I will add I do not use any fuel additives in my machines with the exception of lead replacements for my engines from the 50's and 60's.
I own a leaf/grass blower and a chain saw from the early 90s plus a weed eater that was new 2010. I never replaced a fuel line on them. Fuel is drained every fall when I'm done for the season.
I have 2 IH Cub Cadets 100s that has steel fuel lines. I have an IH Cub Cadet 70-128-149-149 with rubber fuel line(s). I also own an 1949 Farmall H (steel fuel line). The carbs are ran dry when I am done using one for the day. Again as I stated in an earlier post I have no fuel related issues.
My main mower is an 1996 Simplicity Landlord. Fuel tank is under the seat. It still has the original fuel line after 1420 hours on the hour meter.

It sounds like one of previous posters has fuel storage problem(s). How, what you store your fuel in and where you store your can cause problems like you are having. I use an 1 gallon steel container and a plastic fuel storage container(s) for 4 cycle gas engines. All my fuel containers have a block of wood between the floor and fuel container.....not the cold damp floor. I will shake the fuel container before I add any fuel to make sure all the components are mix together again.

This works for me.
 

dramsey

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Ivesdale, IL
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D Ramsey
I own a leaf/grass blower and a chain saw from the early 90s plus a weed eater that was new 2010. I never replaced a fuel line on them. Fuel is drained every fall when I'm done for the season.
I have 2 IH Cub Cadets 100s that has steel fuel lines. I have an IH Cub Cadet 70-128-149-149 with rubber fuel line(s). I also own an 1949 Farmall H (steel fuel line). The carbs are ran dry when I am done using one for the day. Again as I stated in an earlier post I have no fuel related issues.
My main mower is an 1996 Simplicity Landlord. Fuel tank is under the seat. It still has the original fuel line after 1420 hours on the hour meter.

It sounds like one of previous posters has fuel storage problem(s). How, what you store your fuel in and where you store your can cause problems like you are having. I use an 1 gallon steel container and a plastic fuel storage container(s) for 4 cycle gas engines. All my fuel containers have a block of wood between the floor and fuel container.....not the cold damp floor. I will shake the fuel container before I add any fuel to make sure all the components are mix together again.

This works for me.
It is good to hear you are not experiencing those issues but unfortunately the issues do exist for a lot of folks.
 
Last edited:

Thomas

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Oct 11, 2019
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Rockland, Pa. 16374
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Thomas
Ok guys I am ready to ask about my next project on my 1811. Here is my question. Why does it steer so hard? I had 2 of these at one time, the other one steered like it had power steering. I sold it to a friend of mine for his camp at the river. I bought the one new that I kept because the other one had some other issues, which I ended up fixing for him anyways. But I do not understand, these 2 tractors were 1 or 2 years apart in age, but the other one steered a whole lot easier than mine. it was the older one, WHY?? Can anyone help with this. I have adjusted the bearing at the bottom, I have taken the play out with the screw on the side, I actually replaced that once. Keep in mind guys thing always steered this hard !! Oh one more thing, yes I greased this thing, maybe too much !!
 

mfrade

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New Bedford, MA
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Mike Frade
Did you also grease the king pins at each end of the axle?
Are the end joints for the steering linkage in good shape?
Do you know if the box is turning hard? There was a bearing kit that helped some - it went to the box at the pitman arm and wiki says this
Pitman arm
The Pitman arm is a steering component in an automobile or truck. As a linkage attached to the steering box sector shaft, it converts the angular motion of the sector shaft into the linear motion needed to steer the wheels. The arm is supported by the sector shaft and supports the drag link or center link with a ball joint .

Those are all the "big" things that I remember.. I'm sure others will have more.
 

Thomas

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Oct 11, 2019
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Rockland, Pa. 16374
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Thomas
Hi, yes I roll the rubber back on the tie rod ends and squirt 40 wgt. motor oil in them and I do this frequently. I do it to all of them and I know if I jack it up it turns easily, this doesn't make sense to me !? I have always performed good maintenance on all of my equipment. But this steering thing has ALWAYS BEEN A pain. And the pitman arm is just where it was when I bought it. I do not understand why this is. ?????????
 
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