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Keeping Choke and Throttle Cables lubed up and free

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dsarow

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Dean W.Sarow
I have a 125 that sits more than it gets used.What is the best way to free up cables that are stuck,what is the best lube to use?Thanks guys.
 

kmcconaughey

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This is one place that WD-40 can actually be useful. Maybe not so much for when it's just setting in storage and has stuck, Charlie's recomendations are better for that. However for use in the winter, WD-40 works quite well to keep melting snow from getting in during snow removal operations like snowthrowing and plowing snow. Any water in the cable can later freeze up the cable, BTDT. After I started to use WD-40 on the cables no more freeze ups. In case anyone here didn't know, WD stands for Water Displacement, in other words it's designed to displace water and it does that quite well.
 

gary noblit

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It's a pain to do but...if it won;t move at all..Remove cable wrap in a circle and soak it in pan of diesel or kero for a week ...That's about the last chance before a new one.In the machine ,I have many times wrapped a small rag around the knob end soaked with pb and let it set for a day or so before working it a lot....The sticky part is not breaking the knob while you're trying to get it to move.
 

stucker

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Scot Tucker
I find that its the application method as much as the chemical used. I use a syringe (without the needle) to inject oil/WD40/PB Blaster etc into the cable casing. The syringe helps to control and pinpoint the the flow. This method has worked for me on all my farm/lawn equipment including my Harley. Not to mention, the clean up is minimal.

Just another opinion and perspective of what works for me.
 

dsarow

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Dean W.Sarow
I find that its the application method as much as the chemical used. I use a syringe (without the needle) to inject oil/WD40/PB Blaster etc into the cable casing. The syringe helps to control and pinpoint the the flow. This method has worked for me on all my farm/lawn equipment including my Harley. Not to mention, the clean up is minimal.

Just another opinion and perspective of what works for me.
I decided after reading all these great tips,I would take the cables off.That would make the application,like you recommended so much easier and less of a mess.I hung and clamped them off by bench.I put two small containers under the ends to catch the drips.I just gave them a squirt, every time I walked by.Working great,and I didn't break the knob off.Thanks again guys,really appreciate all the help.
 

kphill

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If you take them off, you can also coil them up and put them in the bottom of a 5 gallon bucket and cover them with diesel fuel and let them soak for a couple days.. Work like new...
 

eholmes

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Some thing I use to keep those coiled covered cables free, used engine oil. A couple of drops on the exposed wire on both ends of the cable and then work it back and forth a few times a couple of times a season. I also use it on the mule drive hinges, mower lift hinges and deck wheels. I drilled the deck wheel hubs on the last change about 8 years ago and after every mowing lube them. Also grease the mower spindles after every mowing with a high heat lithium grease for wet application. Bought the Red 682 over twenty years ago. Used to mow 3.5 acres then downsized to 1.5 acres. The outer two spindles are original on the 44C deck. The center spindle I replaced the year after I bought the mower. Just some thoughts on keeping Little Red going. Also use high test non-ethanol gas. 😊🇺🇸 Ned
 

mgonitzke

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There is no need to grease the spindles after every mowing; in fact, that may be doing more harm than good. It is possible to over-grease a bearing and damage it. Manual says every 200 hours. Once a season would probably be fine.
 

kmcconaughey

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Matt, the manual for the older decks specifies every 16 hours. I will mention that my dad always insisted that the spindles on the 42" mower, that was bought new in 1969 with the 125 that I still have, be greased before each mowing. That mower deck still has the original bearings.

Older decks:

cubmow05a.jpg


Later decks:

Mower_xxA_13a.jpg
 

gary noblit

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Isn't the real issue the age/type of spindles.Older good quality had tapered roller bearings that are open faced....The majority of newer ones have no zerk because they are sealed bearings.Addng a zerk doesn't mean the bearing will accept grease.I was taught(perhaps incorrectly) that greasing often flushed old grease and residue past seals....messy but efficient...clean wasn't the priority,long life was....of course this was before there was whale poop on the ocean floor....
 

mgonitzke

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Kraig, he mentioned a 682 so I went with the "newer" number. 16 hours is still a lot more than "every mowing" though- In a dry year I won't put that many hours on mowing in a whole season. YMMV, etc.

Comparing the design of the ST-745 bearings in the "A" and "C" decks to the older ones, it doesn't look like the old grease can escape as easily (nor can debris get in as easily), hence the much longer interval. I'd also speculate those are more likely to be harmed by over-greasing. The earlier (and later aluminum housing spindles) with tapered roller bearings have one seal installed backwards, so the old grease can escape fairly effortlessly. Probably won't hurt those to grease every time, but still a waste of grease, IMO. Those bearings are about the most common tapered roller bearings ever made, and are very inexpensive as a result. The grease to grease them every time probably costs more than replacing them slightly more frequently :)

And as aside, when I went through my 60" Haban, I elected to put sealed bearings in because a) another common size that is cheap to replace and b) the lower cup/shield on the spindle is so poorly designed that the lower bearing will just end up full of crap and wear out quickly without a seal.
 

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