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Fix for CC100 steering slop

IH Cub Cadet Tractor Forum

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rogerdleonard

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Feb 5, 2022
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92
what started out as a minor refurb on my latest 100 has turned into one of those “might as well “ jobs. this one has about a quarter rotation play and is a bit sloppy at the dash. is there anything that can be done without pulling the whole thing?

and if not, any pointers on pulling the shaft and rebuilding? and how much of a pain is this?
 

lpalma

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new jersey
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Lewis Palma
The biggest job is getting the steering wheel off. The rest is easy, jack up the front of the 100 high enough to remove the column, then the drag link on the steering arm, then remove the 2 bolts holding it on and slide out from the bottom.
 

lpalma

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Lewis Palma
You could, be aware that the shaft is hollow. Before you begin, PB blaster or other concoctions will help getting the wheel off. After that put a nut on the shaft to protect the threads I usually have good results using an air hammer instead of a puller. Others will chime in to offer other methods...
 

mgwin

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Marty A. Gwin
Lewis is right. Go by and give it a squirt every day for a week or two. Also use a different nut so you won't mess up yours.
I have removed all of mine by sitting on the tractor like normal, and pushing up with my legs on the wheel while hitting the nut. You can also pull up with one hand at the 12 O'clock position at the same time to help get it off.
 

rogerdleonard

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Feb 5, 2022
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great. thanks guys. this one looks like it has been off before. the nut is flat vs acorn shaped.

this was supposed to be a quick touch up and then take it to camp for a mower. but when i tried just removing the rust spots, the crappy repaint came off in sheets. then the wiring started smoking when i was pulling off the VR to remove the grill. (note to self, always pull ground off battery before wiggling wires). harness was a taped up nightmare anyway. you know it’s old when you see that gray electrical tape. so digger you got some business and i got some parts and cowtails
 

dschwandt

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David Schwandt
Also check for slop in all the tie rod and drag link ends,
As well as fore and aft movement where the axle sits in the "C" channel and is secured by the axle pin.
Jack up the Cub on the front support it by the frame and move the axle rearward and forward as well as try to rotate it clockwise and counter CW to check for a stretched "C" channel.

Nothing worse than sloppy steering that makes you look inebriated while mowing of trying to drive straight in a parade.
 

rogerdleonard

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Feb 5, 2022
Messages
92
can anyone tell me what parts i would potentially have to replace to fix the slop in this? haven't pulled it yet so maybe it will be obvious.
 

dschwandt

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David Schwandt
Where do I start?
And yes, most of it should/will be obvious.

Get the front end up on stands and start wiggling things.
You may just be shocked at all the wear and looseness most everywhere in the system.

Axle pivot pin and bushings plus squeezing the "C" channel tight again.
Try to move the axle assembly fore and aft as well as CW and CCW
This will tell you what needs attention in the axle pin area.

Then move onto....
Tie rod and drag link rod ends
Drag link arm and steering knuckle proper
Steering sector bearings
steering sector adjusted properly
Take your pick and check all those areas out.
I'm sure you will find something that need replaced or at least needs some attention.
The owners' manual and service manual are your friends here.
Down load and study them a bit.
Lots of good info there.
Good luck and have fun!!
 

IHinIN

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Apr 26, 2020
Messages
134
Location
Indiana
My 100 had slop everywhere it could have. Starting at the steering wheel:
1) The bushing at the top of the steering column was worn out and the wheel flopped around.
2) The lower bearing cup inside the steering box was worn through and the balls were wearing into the aluminum lower cap.
3) One of the drag link ends was very sloppy.
4) The steering arm connection to the left spindle had a bolt through it instead of the appropriate spirol roll pin and the holes were worn.
5) The tie rod ends were sloppy.
6) The axle pivot pin was seized in the axle and the bushings in the C channel were worn.

I replaced the upper column bushing with a front wheel bearing that I wrapped in electrical tape for a tight fit into the tube.

The steering box got new bearing cups and balls as well as a re-cut of the follower pin to take out the worn spots.

All 4 of the drag link and tie rod ends were replaced.

The steering arm and spindle were cut with a tapered reamer and a tapered pin was installed to eliminate all of the slop at the joint.

I cut the welds between the C channel and frame to remove the front axle. Using a 20 ton press and some heat, the pin finally freed itself from the axle. The bushings in the C channel were bored and sleeved. A new pivot pin was made and a grease zerk was added to the axle.

While the C channel was off, a couple of cracks in the frame were V’d and welded.
 

CӞ44

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Kansas
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My 100 had slop everywhere it could have. Starting at the steering wheel:
1) The bushing at the top of the steering column was worn out and the wheel flopped around.
2) The lower bearing cup inside the steering box was worn through and the balls were wearing into the aluminum lower cap.
3) One of the drag link ends was very sloppy.
4) The steering arm connection to the left spindle had a bolt through it instead of the appropriate spirol roll pin and the holes were worn.
5) The tie rod ends were sloppy.
6) The axle pivot pin was seized in the axle and the bushings in the C channel were worn.

I replaced the upper column bushing with a front wheel bearing that I wrapped in electrical tape for a tight fit into the tube.

The steering box got new bearing cups and balls as well as a re-cut of the follower pin to take out the worn spots.

All 4 of the drag link and tie rod ends were replaced.

The steering arm and spindle were cut with a tapered reamer and a tapered pin was installed to eliminate all of the slop at the joint.

I cut the welds between the C channel and frame to remove the front axle. Using a 20 ton press and some heat, the pin finally freed itself from the axle. The bushings in the C channel were bored and sleeved. A new pivot pin was made and a grease zerk was added to the axle.

While the C channel was off, a couple of cracks in the frame were V’d and welded.
Next up: pinstripes & fuzzy dice? 😉
Keep up the good work!
 

dfrisk

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Nov 12, 2001
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Dennis Frisk
Dave - I actually found that being inebriated while mowing helped me drive straighter with worn steering on a CC. Heim joints instead of the ball & socket ends are much tighter and last longer. The ones on my #72 have been in use since about 1980, back when it was my only tractor.
My zero turn actually has a cup holder, right on the left side console with the ignition key, mower pto on/off switch, tach/hour meter that the tach only worked about 2 hours. It's really hard to drive a zero turn with one hand, so having a couple beers while mowing had to stop. With no cup holder on my CC tractors once I grabbed a beer I kept drinking till it was gone and dropped the empty on the way by the 12-pack while I grabbed another.
Seeing how my #72 is 54 years old, and about everything in the steering has been replaced once, and worn out again, the cross hole on the top of the left spindle that was replaced about 1981 is badly worn again, I resisted temptation to weld the steering arm solid, but I have a newer heavier home-made steering arm that clamps on somewhere in the shop I need to finish. It may get a couple tack welds if/when I put it one.
The steering on the 70 is pretty tight, and the 982 had everything in the steering box replaced except the steering shaft. It really wasn't that expensive to rebuild.
 

rogerdleonard

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Joined
Feb 5, 2022
Messages
92
thanks for all the info guys. plan is to pull the column this weekend if i get my other to-do's done. i will update this thread with what i find and any fixes i apply. this 100 is turning into waaaay more work than i planned but thats ok. i am learning as i go and these old narrow frames are worth the time (and $$) to keep them going. i'm just glad i'm not trying to do this for a profit, i'd be eating grass and living in my truck.
 
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