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Considering an electric XT1 LT42E........whataya know about them...?

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mgwin

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David,
Yes, especially if left under a tarp!

Mike,
To me, an electric lawnmower is weird all the way around. ;) It would definitely need to be stored inside. Replacing the batteries often would be expensive also.
 
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gary noblit

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Jim said it, small engine guys don't want to do electronics school..In my area of southern Mi. they are only 2 certified repair facilities left and neither would do an elec. mower.I personally almost never work on any top end machine less than 15 yrs old; many of them have "motherboards ".That means I have not a clue how or what to look for.Local JD dealer told me they have no way to check some electronic ignition systems in their own machines.They put in a new one as a test procedure...This is the future....It makes far better sense to repair older trusted machines ..at least to me.. I just finished a refurb on a zt.600 in parts to make it right was well worth the cost.carb,coils,starter,belts, etc...
 

gary noblit

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David,
Yes, especially if left under a tarp!

Mike,
To me, an electric lawnmower is weird all the way around. ;) It would definitely need to be stored inside. Replacing the batteries often would be expensive also.
I was recently given an elec wheel chair..Hopefully to find a vet in need..The batteries are shot est cost to replace 400..
 

justinpittman

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small engine guys don't want to do electronics school..
Or engine guys in general. It probably has nothing to do with ability. And nothing to do with newness factor -- electronics have been around since the 50s in consumer goods, and in mowers in the 70s.

Nostalgia plays a big factor IMO. Electronics don't make deep rumbling growling sounds that guys grew up with :) You could synthesize the sound but not the same.

Thanks to OP for asking about the LT42E again. I've hemmed and hawed about getting one. I do think electric with new battery chemistries is the future.

I went LiFePo upgrade for our camper. Man, these new batteries (specifically Battle Born, made in USA, 10yr warranty!). Our camper never dips below 13V despite several days offgrid. And these newer batteries include heaters to solve the problem that Li won't work below freezing.

Again, 10yr warranty! Nobody warranties anything that long anymore, even gas powered mowers. Just wish the rest of the electronic components were as good as these batteries. Sealed motors, sealed controllers, heavy duty HV wiring sheathing, better springs/dampers, etc. are what's needed.
 

mgwin

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We have many types of machinery at work, mostly older equipment. I work on a lot of this equipment. The machines that were made in the 90's have a lot of electronics. Control boards, inverters, converters, relays, and contactors.
After 10 years, most of this equipment is outdated, and most parts are obsolete. This is the manufacturer's motive, in order to make customers buy their new and updated equipment. The components in the electronics are also designed to become obsolete, so the electronic repair companies can only repair this equipment for so long.

I would almost guarantee that electric mowers will follow suit. I would hate to think that I would have to buy a new mower every 10-12 years, and replace the batteries every 5-7 years. I have had my SCAG for 17 years and no issues, other than replacing the battery once. Cost me $24.00.
Bought my first mower back in 83', and my second (and hopefully last) mower in 05.'
I am not saying E mowers are not ok, if you don't mind buying new ones and replacing the batteries every little bit.
Just keep in mind, that when Uncle Joe requires everyone to buy an E vehicle, there will not be enough electricity to charge them all! :yikes: :roflol:
 

kphill

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Or engine guys in general. It probably has nothing to do with ability. And nothing to do with newness factor -- electronics have been around since the 50s in consumer goods, and in mowers in the 70s.

Nostalgia plays a big factor IMO. Electronics don't make deep rumbling growling sounds that guys grew up with :) You could synthesize the sound but not the same.

Thanks to OP for asking about the LT42E again. I've hemmed and hawed about getting one. I do think electric with new battery chemistries is the future.

I went LiFePo upgrade for our camper. Man, these new batteries (specifically Battle Born, made in USA, 10yr warranty!). Our camper never dips below 13V despite several days offgrid. And these newer batteries include heaters to solve the problem that Li won't work below freezing.

Again, 10yr warranty! Nobody warranties anything that long anymore, even gas powered mowers. Just wish the rest of the electronic components were as good as these batteries. Sealed motors, sealed controllers, heavy duty HV wiring sheathing, better springs/dampers, etc. are what's needed.
Justin. Here near where I live they are in the process of building a huge battery factory in Lordstown, Ohio.. Batteries are the future whether we like it or not and the battery factories are bringing living wages to our country instead of building elsewhere.. And really E drive is not new tech..There was more E vehicles before 1920 than gas.. We have just starting to wean ourselves from oil and coal due to the environment..
 

justinpittman

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There was more E vehicles before 1920 than gas..
Yup, Jay Leno has one he refurbed. It looks like an Amish buggy but with batteries, hehe.

Planned obsolescence didn't start with electronics, but yea the tech and EE world should be ashamed for making it worse. Tech is my day job. The amount of silica and rare Earth metals that are wasted by the 3-5 year cycle is disgusting.

Plastic is the real pits. Show me a plastic in some consumer good that outlasts metal. Sure it might last (and biodegrade long after we're all dead) but in brittle bits and pieces not as a usable part, lol! That's one reason I buy old stuff (usually cast iron, steel, or aluminum) and put it into Daily Driver use.
 

kphill

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Yup, Jay Leno has one he refurbed. It looks like an Amish buggy but with batteries, hehe.

Planned obsolescence didn't start with electronics, but yea the tech and EE world should be ashamed for making it worse. Tech is my day job. The amount of silica and rare Earth metals that are wasted by the 3-5 year cycle is disgusting.

Plastic is the real pits. Show me a plastic in some consumer good that outlasts metal. Sure it might last (and biodegrade long after we're all dead) but in brittle bits and pieces not as a usable part, lol! That's one reason I buy old stuff (usually cast iron, steel, or aluminum) and put it into Daily Driver use.
One reason that electric came before gas was like today, gas engines were mostly water cooled, and ethylene gylcol antifreeze did not go into commercial production until 1925... Before 1930 most farmers in cold weather states put the car in the barn, drained the water out and used the horse...So like one invention changed our travel habits then, Now a new one is changing ours now,,,
 

dschwandt

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Small hit & miss engines use water as a coolant
Visit any old time tractor show and you will see tons of them in operation
 

mfrade

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One reason that electric came before gas was like today, gas engines were mostly water cooled, and ethylene gylcol antifreeze did not go into commercial production until 1925... Before 1930 most farmers in cold weather states put the car in the barn, drained the water out and used the horse...So like one invention changed our travel habits then, Now a new one is changing ours now,,,
Not sure about out your way but here in New England alcohol was added to lower the freeze point. Even draining the water never removed all of it so alcohol would be added and then if needed the system drained. What water that remained would hopefully not create enough force to cause damage.
 

Mark Evans

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Yup, Jay Leno has one he refurbed. It looks like an Amish buggy but with batteries, hehe.
A Jay Leno shop chair non electric !!!
Planned obsolescence didn't start with electronics, but yea the tech and EE world should be ashamed for making it worse. Tech is my day job. The amount of silica and rare Earth metals that are wasted by the 3-5 year cycle is disgusting.

Plastic is the real pits. Show me a plastic in some consumer good that outlasts metal. Sure it might last (and biodegrade long after we're all dead) but in brittle bits and pieces not as a usable part, lol! That's one reason I buy old stuff (usually cast iron, steel, or aluminum) and put it into Daily Driver use.
 

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justinpittman

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One reason that electric came before gas was like today, gas engines were mostly water cooled, and ethylene gylcol antifreeze did not go into commercial production until 1925... Before 1930 most farmers in cold weather states put the car in the barn, drained the water out and used the horse...So like one invention changed our travel habits then, Now a new one is changing ours now,,,

Not sure about out your way but here in New England alcohol was added to lower the freeze point. Even draining the water never removed all of it so alcohol would be added and then if needed the system drained. What water that remained would hopefully not create enough force to cause damage.

Reminds me of the old B&W movie "Our Vines Have Tender Grapes". Ed Robinson as farmer who drove a gas car during the warm season but switched back to skid pulled horse in winter. Who says ya can't learn nothing from a movie?

In a more related note --

Cub's electric won't work for snowplowing/blowing for me. I read the manual. It says to not charge the batteries below freezing, OK so a heated garage; but then there's a "Low Temp" warning on the dash as well. Cub's exploded diagram of the battery isn't helpful to know for sure that there's heating as part of their BMS, and you have to call a dealer to find the replacement battery. Put 2 & 2 together, that tells me Cub more than likely did _not_ integrate a heating element into their LiOn batteries or the battery compartment, and because LiOn will die if charged below freezing, then this machine is must be kept in a heated garage overwinter. I don't have a heated garage to charge it in, so hard pass for me.
 
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kphill

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Reminds me of the old B&W movie "Our Vines Have Tender Grapes". Ed Robinson as farmer who drove a gas car during the warm season but switched back to skid pulled horse in winter. Who says ya can't learn nothing from a movie?

In a more related note --

Cub's electric won't work for snowplowing/blowing for me. I read the manual. It says to not charge the batteries below freezing, OK so a heated garage; but then there's a "Low Temp" warning on the dash as well. Cub's exploded diagram of the battery isn't helpful to know for sure that there's heating as part of their BMS, and you have to call a dealer to find the replacement battery. Put 2 & 2 together, that tells me Cub more than likely did _not_ integrate a heating element into their LiOn batteries or the battery compartment, and because LiOn will die if charged below freezing, then this machine is must be kept in a heated garage overwinter. I don't have a heated garage to charge it in, so hard pass for me.
Would I buy a new E-Cub?.. No way!.. I guess the point I am trying to get across is that this is the direction not just us but much of the industrialized world is going.... Do I like it?.. Not really but the world does not revolve around me.. I turn 65 this year so it does not effect me.. I will keep my old cubs until I check out and if they don't outlast me I will get an old gasser to carry me through.. It's up to the millennials to work the bugs out...
 

jack casey

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I now have a Cub 102. Over the years had two Elec-Traks, first one sold when moving to HK, second bought after coming home years later. As they were built in the 70's, the operating system needed upgrading to make better use of the drive motor's power. I did that with a Curtis 1204m controller. My Elec-Trak was an E-20 and the drive motor was 1.5 hp. I cannot explain how this relates to a 20hp Deere, but I have seen ET's drag a Deere backwards with its wheels spinning - extraordinary torque. Look at tractor pulling websites. I can see removing the Kohler, mounting a substantial two sheave pulley on the clutch/driveshaft and finding a spot (there'd be lots of room) for a 6"X16" motor.
Now the hard part. You need a minimum of 36V to drive an 800lb tractor, operate ground-engaging attachments (tilling, snowplowing) and the mower (42" max). I always used six Trojan 105's; with normal care they'll last 12 years. You will use a smart charger which takes the battery pack thru the three stages of charging - see Soneil website. Where to place the batteries?? Six will weigh 240 lbs; you may find room under the hood for two and construct a steel back porch for the rest. Motor is wired to the Curtis and two coils, will fit easily under the hood. My ET ran without flaws, the old operating system and the new Kohler. My ET could mow two acres and plow 8-10 driveways.
Cheers, Jack
 

mgwin

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Can you imagine what everyone's light bill is gonna be?!!! If the power companies can keep up, that is. :errrr:
 

kphill

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Can you imagine what everyone's light bill is gonna be?!!! If the power companies can keep up, that is. :errrr:
Not really worried about it.. They are building new solar, wind, and other power generation stations so if thier is demand someone is going supply it... And if they don't and the world keeps getting hotter all those air conditioning units are gonna suck it up anyway..
 

jack casey

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I now have a Cub 102. Over the years had two Elec-Traks, first one sold when moving to HK, second bought after coming home years later. As they were built in the 70's, the operating system needed upgrading to make better use of the drive motor's power. I did that with a Curtis 1204m controller. My Elec-Trak was an E-20 and the drive motor was 1.5 hp. I cannot explain how this relates to a 20hp Deere, but I have seen ET's drag a Deere backwards with its wheels spinning - extraordinary torque. Look at tractor pulling websites. I can see removing the Kohler, mounting a substantial two sheave pulley on the clutch/driveshaft and finding a spot (there'd be lots of room) for a 6"X16" motor.
Now the hard part. You need a minimum of 36V to drive an 800lb tractor, operate ground-engaging attachments (tilling, snowplowing) and the mower (42" max). I always used six Trojan 105's; with normal care they'll last 12 years. You will use a smart charger which takes the battery pack thru the three stages of charging - see Soneil website. Where to place the batteries?? Six will weigh 240 lbs; you may find room under the hood for two and construct a steel back porch for the rest. Motor is wired to the Curtis and two coils, will fit easily under the hood. My ET ran without flaws, the old operating system and the new Kohler. My ET could mow two acres and plow 8-10 driveways.
Cheers, Jack
Oops! Spelling mistake - 'and the new Kohler' should read 'new Curtis.'
 

mgwin

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The place where I work got into solar powered energy. They have several acres of open land, and decided to install solar panels to power the machinery. After installing all those panels on all that land, they generated enough solar power to run almost one whole machine out of the 50 or so that they have! :errrr:
 
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