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dfrisk

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Dennis Frisk
Tim D. - do a search for "decarbon cylinder head" and you'll find several posts in the last several years where I've described the process. It's a process a couple of us here read about in Hot Rod magazine back around 1970.
 

dfrisk

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Dennis Frisk
John L. - Add-on light switch for your 1450, put the drill away. Don't drill holes in your dash!

I installed a lighted amp gauge on my 982, the light wired direct from the light switch that's integral with the ignition key switch. I also installed a white rear work light with a separate switch right next to that light to turn it off/on depending on the situation. The light is wired to the keyed light switch with the rest of the lights. Tractor also has two red taillights as does your 1450.

You'll look long and hard and still not find lighted hour meters. They are something that does not need constant monitoring. Most OEM's used to mount them out of normal sight of the operator. And no way would I install an instrument light to illuminate an hour meter. Now if I had a tachometer with an hour meter in it THAT would be illuminated!

And ANY extra light circuits you add to a vehicle, car, truck, Cub Cadet, whatever, should have an in-line fuse as close to the battery as possible, like within 2-3 inches! The circuit should use an appropriately sized fuse for the load too.
 

tsdeese

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Mar 31, 2005
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timothy deese
hey guys I got a question the triangle shaped piece that holds up the foot rest and the implement lift handle is it supposed to be mounted inside the frame or outside the frame I've seen it both ways and just wonder which one is correct?
 

dgregg

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David A. Gregg
My 1650 that my son has been using quit last week on him. Just quit like you shut it off. Try to start and it is dead, nothing happens. He tried a different battery and has checked all connections in the battery compartment. What would be the likely problem, key switch maybe? It is located about 85 miles away and I'm trying to help diagnose this from long distance. Unfortunately he has no test light of volt meter. Thanks guys
 

aschumacher

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Allen Schumacher
Dave, your son has to go to a TSC or car parts or wallmart and get at least a test light. If we don't know where 12 volts is or is not, none of us are going to be very much help.
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Also, one of you should go to the bottom of the home page and go to 'wiring diagrams' and print out the diagram for that tractor, that way every one will be talking about the same things.
 
J

jclazar

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Steve B, Dennis F- Thank you both for the thoughtful suggestions! For us, drilling holes is a big no-no. As for the rear work light, I simply used a piece of 90* angle mounted to the left side of the frame. You may note on the Quiet Line, that there are two holes which I assume were in-place from the factory that served as the mount position.

Both ideas offered point to a possibility of a hole location in place of one of the two fuse holders familiar to the Quiet Line. This would let me have the marine-type inline fuse close to the battery as mentioned.

Thank you for the help!
 

dfrisk

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Dennis Frisk
John L. - What do the two existing fuses protect? One should be for the electric PTO, and the other for the lights & ignition? If so, if the wiring for the lights on the one fuse has enough extra "ampacity", you could add a light or two to the existing light circuit.

Does your tractor have a separate push/pull light switch?

Not sure what you mean by a " marine in-line fuse holder" but I've had the last couple that used glass tube (AGC) fuses burn up, melt the ends of the fuse container. Last one I installed was a sealed blade type (ATC/ATM) fuse holder. It's been fine for three years, longer than any of the failed AGC style fuse holders.

The subject of proper joining of wiring always comes up on another forum. In my opinion, soldering is the only way to join automotive wiring and then seal the joint with heat shrink tubing. Some people argue that aviation wiring uses crimped connectors. Just another excellent reason to NOT FLY! SON & I raced R/C gas/fuel and electric off-road racing for many years and only had 2-3 soldered connections fail. The vibration from engines running 30,000-40,000 rpm plus the G-forces of the jumps, landings, and crashes are way beyond what planes see. Except in crashes!
 

bnolte

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Oct 11, 2006
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Bruce Nolte
It has been a while since I posted here, but I decided to revive an old project to attach a Brinley plow to the 102 I restored back in 2009. It had a nonstandard hitch which looked like it was cobbled together for an OT tractor. My Dad made a coulter blade out of a saw blade, and some other odds and ends, but that was about as far as it got.

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First order of business was to remove the old hitch. I had acquired the upper part of the sleeve hitch assembly from a local collector of old cubs, and fabricated the rest. I was inspired by a leftover piece of 2 inch 1/4 inch wall box section welded to a piece of half inch thick plate. Although it isn't a faithful reproduction of the sleeve hitch adapter, it could be made into one in the future. In the meantime, I can detach the plow with 2 bolts. and the whole hitch adapter with 2 bolts and 2 clevis pins. The side pieces of the sleeve hitch adapter are made of 1/2 inch thick by 2 inch wide steel I found at the local scrapyard, and welded on all 4 sides of each end of the box section piece. What I didn't need for the crossmember became the receiver for the plow, sort of like a trailer hitch. To give the plow some rigidity back and forth, I filled the rest of the receiver with short pieces of steel held in with the receiver bolt and bolted to the backbone of the plow.

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Then I plowed up the pumpkin patch, and celebrated with a homebrew. I did the initial setup by putting the tractor on 6 inch concrete blocks and adjusting the plow angle and link length to keep the plow off the ground while up, and have the plow level to the floor while down. I don't know if 6 inches is doable with one of these little tractors, I had to shorten the link to get plow of the ground once I had the tires off the blocks. Also thinking of offsetting the plow to the left a bit to tighten up the furrows. Any advice from you plow guys would be appreciated.

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dtrend

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Apr 21, 2011
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Don Trend
Harry, you're right about the timing marks. It was hidden under some rust, thanks.
 

sblunier

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Steve Blunier "Mr. Plow" (Central IL)
BTW, drilling holes for well thought out add ons and attachments is A OK with me!!!!! I'm a resto modder! !!!!
 

dfrisk

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Dennis Frisk
Steve - SON welded up about TWENTY holes in the hood of the 70, now it looks great. There was at least a dozen holes in the dash, so I bought a decent used one. A cordless drill CAN BE A DANGEROUS WEAPON in some people's hands!

Some day I may weld the factory dash up, but I was in a crunch for time.

I've drilled a few holes in my #72, but I've tried to use existing holes as much as I could.
 

sblunier

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Steve Blunier "Mr. Plow" (Central IL)
Agreed, but I'll put a hole in a pedestal beside the key switch!
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bsell

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Nov 23, 2006
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Brian Sell
Hello,
Does anyone have any suggestion for removing paint overspray from an engine serial number tag that is in otherwise great shape? This would be without removing the black paint on the tag, any good suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks.
 

digger

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Digger
Brian S.
Two words.

Goof Off
 

dfrisk

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Dennis Frisk
Steve - Seemed like IH tried to put everything on the front face of the dash, key ignition switch, push button starter switch, chock, even the accessory amp gauge. I move as much of that stuff off that face as I can. WAY too easy to bump the key or gauge with your knee. Choke and shotgun starter switch not so prone to damage.

It's not so bad on an SGT, most of the added length is valuable knee room.
 

sblunier

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Steve Blunier "Mr. Plow" (Central IL)
Agreed Denny......lots of bent/broken keys out there!!!!!
 
J

jclazar

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Dennis F- My 1450 retains it's original, standard light switch in good working order, along with the two front headlamps, and two rear red reflector lights. My model 72 is equipped with the IH push/pull switch I think you are referring to.

On this 1450, some one before me elected to run the pto fuse through a blade-type fuse. The pto switch and pto itself preform wonderful! This leaves the lower fuse common to these Quiet Line models open in this particular example.

I really think the original fuse holders are quite neat in their own right. But, as you thoughtfully shared, I will rout the hot from the battery to a marine type fuse holder. These sort of holders are simply water proof, and are made of a 74 or 88 duro flex { fpvc } material made for use on boats, or what have you.

I certainly enjoy and respect the communication received here! I can take the time to weigh in the suggestions regarding just what I want to do for my IH Cub Cadet 1450. I prefer to keep the fuse, but my addition of the rear white light is a permanent modification. I like Steve B's idea however.

Those rear white lights are handy! I don't get caught in the dark too often to bother lighting the instrument gages on this Quiet Line.
 

bsell

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Nov 23, 2006
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Brian Sell
Charlie,
I thought you were calling me one at first.....since I've been known to be one at times.
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. I've never heard of it but will certainly try it, thanks much!
 

digger

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Digger
Brian S.
Haven't we all!
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